Yesterday I told a friend I view one of my online roles as that of a pro-life Tokyo Rose.

For those who don’t know, “Tokyo Rose” was the name given to a small group of female Japanese radio personalities who attempted to demoralize American GIs during World War II by broadcasting Japanese propaganda.

Lowering the other side’s morale is an important component of winning any war, and so it is in our war against abortion.

Online pro-life activists play an important part. Just as we read pro-aborts’ posts, tweets, and comments, they read ours. Pro-life activists in other areas, such as those who protest abortion clinics and abortionists’ homes, also help demoralize them.

I read three encouraging pieces yesterday that reminded me this strategy is important and is working. As much as abortion proponents like to bully and portray bravado, don’t be fooled.


Abortion staffer ashamed of job

Example one comes from The Abortioneers blog, written by about a girl, an abortion worker, on January 5:

  Sometimes it’s easier to discuss abortion and other times, it just isn’t easy at all. Probably some of it depends on how much is going on at work (if it’s stressful or we’re having a lot of protesters, I tend not to want to discuss work outside work as much. Especially with people who just won’t get it anyway).

  It can feel isolating to have the people who are closest to you not understand your work, your commitment to it, and your passion for it. Only recently have I been able to have conversations with my dad about abortion after years of bitter silence. Sometimes, it’s still frustrating to even talk to my husband; for example, if I have a sh** day, he is quick to tell me I should just leave the clinic. He reminds me that I already have to put up with protesters and the stigma that comes along with being an abortioneer. He asks why I should stick around if my boss is being… err… unappreciative….

  It’s stigma that really makes it so difficult to talk about our work. I haven’t even discussed it with my son’s best friend’s mom…. We do mommy things together all the time; we take our sons to soccer practice, to basketball practice. Over the summer, our kids did gymnastics and baseball. We see each other almost every day. Still, I am vague about my work and have never used the word “abortion.” She probably knows. I’ve mentioned a**hole protesters before so hopefully she’s put it all together, but we’ve never talked about it: abortion. Not once. I have no idea how she feels about it, but obviously, I’m worried or else I’d speak more freely.

(As an aside, there’s also a role for “best friend’s mom” to play, if she is pro-life… of making herself available to talk, being nonjudgmental, carefully helping her friend eventually see the wrong of her line of work, helping her get out of the industry.)

Donations way down

Example two comes from Planned Parenthood’s newly released 2009-2010 annual report, which indicates private donations are significantly down – by 28% from its 2008-2009 annual report. This means societal stigma against Planned Parenthood is growing.

During the same time period, government funding to Planned Parenthood rose by over $100 million, to $487.4 million from $363.2 million.

This only means Planned Parenthood is becoming more reliant on taxpayer subsidies, so when it eventually loses the benefit of its political friends, it will be in big trouble.

Planned Parenthood kicked out of school

Example three comes from a January 5 Saratogian.com story, indicating a New York school system has severed a 20-year relationship with the local Planned Parenthood to teach sex ed to middle and high school students.

Shenendehowa School District spokesperson Kelly DeFeciani said Planned Parenthood’s presence had become a “distraction,” that although “a few parents” perennially complained about Planned Parenthood, this year “a larger than usual group objected.”

This means awareness about Planned Parenthood is spreading.

So be encouraged, my fellow Tokyo Roses. We are winning the war to stigmatize and demoralize the other side. Keep it up.

Reprinted with permission from JillStanek.com