June 11, 2012 (Unmaskingchoice.ca) - Tong Phuoc Phuc is an exceptional man, with an exceptional way of dealing with the rampant abortion rate in Vietnam: He adopts the unwanted children. Over fifty of them so far, to be exact.

In Vietnam, abortion is common and practiced at nearly every hospital. Faced with often crippling poverty, women often choose abortion—over 114,000 of them every single year. Faced with the reality that many of these women do not know where to turn and a severe shortage of shelters for pregnant women, Phuc has opened the doors of his home to any mother who needs care and needs a place for her child to stay.

Eight years ago, Phuc promised God that if his wife survived a difficult labour giving birth to their son, he would find some way to help others. According to one article detailing his remarkable story, “As his wife lay recuperating after the difficult birth, he recalls seeing many pregnant women going into the delivery room but always leaving alone. ‘I was wondering, where are the babies?’ he says, cradling an infant in each arm. ‘Then I realized they had abortions.’”

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He first began saving money from his wages as a construction contractor to buy a plot of land to bury the unwanted children, picking them up from hospitals and abortion clinics and giving them a proper burial. Everyone, even his wife questioned what he was doing—as of last year, there were “some 7,000 tiny plots dotting the shady hillside, many marked with bright red, pink and yellow artificial roses.”

Post-abortive women began to hear about Phuc’s actions, and came to his little cemetery to pray. When women considering abortions also came to him, he opened his doors and they began moving into his home.

One woman considering abortion talked to Phuc first, and then changed her mind. “She moved into the 904 square foot house soon after and remains there with seven other new or expectant mothers. They spend their days washing, feeding, burping, changing and playing with the babies…It’s a full-time operation that involves Phuc’s entire family. His older sister manages the chaos, mixing vats of strained potatoes and carrots and preparing formula for bottles, while shushing crying babies and chasing crawlers.”

Phuc’s work has begun to draw attention, and donations come in from as far away as the United States. The president of Vietnam has praised him for “caring for women and children scorned by society.” He does not, however, run an orphanage—his goal is to either reunite the babies with their mothers, or raise them as his own children. He has managed to reunite twenty-seven children with their mothers.

It might seem to many people that Phuc’s life is a hard one, but that is not the way he sees it: “I will continue this job until my last breath of life. I will encourage my children to take over to help other people who are underprivileged.”

Truly, this man’s life is a testimony to selflessness. His desire to help others no matter what the personal is an inspiration.