LONDON, December 21, 2012 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Boys are receiving the bulk of their “sex education” from online porn, a report by a cross-party parliamentary group has warned, which leads young people to have “unprotected” sex without condoms, which in turn leads to unplanned pregnancies.

The solution offered by MPs is to include mixed-sex “relationship counselling” to current sex education classes.

Porn has “negated the primacy of relationships whilst promoting a self-centered focus of sex,” the report added. The government is also proposing to create automatic prompts for porn filters to be offered by internet service providers.

“For teenage girls, there is a lot of pressure on them to have sex, to look sexy and to conform to stereotypes of what the opposite sex sees as attractive, which are often reinforced in these outdoor adverts, music videos and pornography,” they found.

Coeducational “relationship” classes would “provide a context where mutual learning and respect between the two sexes can be encouraged, thereby forming a more rounded view of what is involved in a sexual relationship as opposed to just a sexual encounter.”

Teens are given lessons in how to use condoms in sex-ed, but then are “sent off to enjoy themselves.”

“Sexual bullying” has been a staple of British news reports for several years. In 2010, a YouGov poll of 788 teenagers from 16 to 18 years old found that almost one-third of girls say they have been subjected to “unwanted sexual touching” at school.

In 2008, the BBC news program Panorama quoted a UK anti-bullying and child sexual abuse charity said there has been a dramatic rise in the problem in schools. “Certainly over the last four or five years on the Kidscape helpline we used to get maybe one or two calls a year about sexual bullying, but now we are getting two or three calls a week.”

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In 2006-07, the most recent available statistics, there were 3,500 suspensions and 140 expulsions from English schools for sexual misconduct. Offenses ranged from creating explicit graffiti to rape. Two hundred and eighty of those cases were from primary schools and in 20 cases the child responsible was just five years old, the BBC reported.

Panorama quoted Paula Telford of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) who said, “We’ve had examples for instance of a 16-year-old boy who raped a much younger boy in a secluded setting in school.”

“We’ve had a 10-year-old who was forcing other children to perform sex acts on him, and performing sex acts on them. And we’ve had much younger children who’ve been inappropriately touching each other.”