July 23, 2012, (LifeSiteNews.com) -  In colleges from Texas A&M to Notre Dame and beyond, young people are using their media savvy skills to promote a chemical-free marriage.  The youth-based network launched 1flesh.org, which presents countless scientific arguments against the now standard forms of contraceptives and offers an alternative. 

1flesh.org went live on March 21, 2012, the day the Supreme Court passed ObamaCare.  “We thought this is going to be a huge event in our nation’s history that is going to bring the issue of contraceptives onto the table. So we marked the day with our conversation,” Marc Barnes, the president for 1flesh.org told LifeSiteNews. 

The site promotes Natural Family Planning instead of artificial contraceptives for married couples looking to space their pregnancies. Staying close to the media of youth, the site offers numerous audio/visual clips, blogs, graphics and testimonials. 

Young girls and guys are filmed explaining the toll contraceptives have on couples at an emotional and physical level.  Young couples speak about their success with Natural Family Planning; statistics are cited, and help offered.

“A dissatisfaction with the sexual culture” prompted the creation of the site said Barnes.  “We live in a world were 1 in 4 teenage girls are getting an STD, where 1 in 3 women are reported to have experienced sexual abuse at some point in their life, where pornography addiction is rampant, where people are by and large unsatisfied with their sex-lives.” 

There is also “a general decline in the idea of lasting awesome relationships and really positive marriages, and romance…a serious lack of romance in our culture.” 

1flesh.org holds that the widespread acceptance of artificial contraceptives plays a large role in the misuse of sex in our society and ultimately damages women.  According to statistics on the site, these contraceptives lower the sex-drive of women, lower sexual satisfaction, and lead to cancer. 

They promote instead Natural Family Planning, a method that uses the woman’s naturally infertile periods to space pregnancies within marriage. “Total union between man and women with nothing held back, that this is the point of sexuality…and when we aim at that we ennoble man,” says Barnes.

The website’s graphics are youthful in design and the computer lingo is attractive to most young age groups.  It wasn’t so much planned that way as happened naturally, since it is designed and created by members of the current youth culture, albeit “a slightly more elevated” culture, Barnes is quick to add. 

The arguments against artificial contraceptives are purely scientific, staying far away from moral or spiritual persuasion.  The site is a resource for Christians and non-Christians alike.  “We’d hate to limit this kind of vital information to a simply religious audience,” says Barnes.

1flesh.org plans to open chapters at universities, hold talks, host speakers, and spread the message to young people.  “We want to make this as much as a physical campaign as much as it is an online campaign,” says Barnes. 

They have the drive and enthusiasm; financial funding is the only thing holding them back.  They have been four weeks in the business, and already people are coming forward to lend professional assistance, while others pledge financial support. 

The feedback has been positive and negative.  There are people that “are incredibly excited that a thing like this actually exists…people have been writing in saying, ‘I have been praying for this,’” says Barnes. 

But it is also “causing a disruption from the modern mind, squads of people are shocked that this movement exists.” Few, however, can argue with the facts presented on the site.  They can’t argue against the statistics and facts.  “That’s actually a great confidence boost,” says Barnes. 

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