WASHINGTON, D.C., February 13, 2013, (LifeSiteNews.com) – The world's most influential advice columnist dispensed some words of dubious wisdom in her most recent column on the subject of abortion.

In Tuesday's column, she answered a letter from a boyfriend who felt betrayed that his girlfriend of nearly four years did not tell him that she once had an abortion.

“My reaction is feelings of disgust, betrayal and of having been lied to,” he said. “Am I overreacting or are my feelings warranted?”

“Abortion is a deeply personal and often complex decision for women,” replied “Abigail Van Buren,” now the pen name of Jeanne Phillips. “Ultimately, I am told, most women feel a sense of relief after an abortion.”

Despite the putative relief, she wrote, “many do not feel that it is something to celebrate and may not be comfortable sharing that they have had one.”

Numerous studies have confirmed a link between abortion, depression, and suicide. A team of Chinese researchers from Anhui Medical College found last year that post-abortive women were 49 percent more likely to experience depression.

A 2008 study by the University of Oslo concluded, “Young adult women who undergo induced abortion may be at increased risk for subsequent depression.”

In 2005, Finland’s National Research and Development Center for Welfare and Health (STAKES) studied the deaths of all women of reproductive age over a 13-year period (1987-2000). It found deaths from suicide, accidents and homicide are 248 percent higher in the year following an abortion, while women who had given birth in the past year had the lowest likelihood of death.

Jeanne Phillips has long favored abortion-on-demand and homosexual marriage. The nom de plume “Abigail Van Buren” now belongs to Jeanne, who took the column over from her mother, Pauline, in 2002.

Born Pauline “Popo” Esther Friedman, the original “Dear Abby” died in January at the age of 94 after suffering many years from Alzheimer's Disease.

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Pauline's twin sister, Esther Pauline “Eppie” Lederer, wrote Abby's chief competitor, “Ask Ann Landers,” for nearly 50 years. The rivalry strained the relationship between the sisters, who were born in Iowa to Jewish emigres from Russia.

Both reportedly admired Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Abby reportedly called the articulate prelate, known for his long-running television series “Life is Worth Living,” “one of the greatest men I ever met – but he'll be a Jew before I'm a Catholic.”

According to the column's distributor, Universal Uclick, Dear Abby “is the most popular and widely syndicated column in the world.”