TUCSON, AZ, April 5, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – An FBI agent drew attention to a possible connection between the man who shot Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and “Christian anti-abortion groups,” according to newly released documents in the 2011 shooting.

In January 2011, Jared Lee Loughner engaged in a shooting spree that left six people dead and 13, including Congresswoman Giffords, wounded.

An investigating detective with the sheriff's office detective wrote in his report that the FBI investigator on the case tipped him off that, in December 2008, Loughner had been caught making graffiti that the agent “believed to be associated with Christian anti-abortion groups.”

The graffiti consisted of the letters “C” and “X,” which Loughner told the arresting officer stood for “Christian.” Loughner spraypainted the letters on a stop sign while his parents were stopped at an intersection.

The revelation is one of many in the 2,700 pages of documents released by the Pima County Sheriff's Department, according to the Phoenix New Times.

It is not clear such symbols are associated with the pro-life movement in any way, much less in the form of graffiti.

Loughner had little apparent sympathy for life at any stage. During a class about suicide bombers at Pima Community College, Loughner asked, “Why don't we just strap bombs to babies?” This and other frightening behavior led to his suspension.

Loughner erected an occultic altar with a mock human skull in a tent in his backyard, rendering his connection with Christian pro-lifers somewhat tenuous.

However, the FBI agent's decision to forge an alleged connection where none seemed to exist fits a pattern of the Obama administration casting Christians in general, and pro-lifers in particular, as latent domestic terrorists or assassins.

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A series of reports from the Department of Homeland Security and West Point, as well as a training seminar for FBI agents, have depicted pro-life Christians as the most likely source of domestic terrorism.

A number of pro-lifers believe the Obama administration is attempting to gather intelligence on the pro-life movement. 

Jill Stanek has revealed that last July 13, FBI agents Conrad Rodriguez and William Sivley paid a visit to her son-in-law, Andy Moore.

Moore, the proprietor of AbortionWiki.org, said the agents pressured him to expose the inner workings of the right-to-life movement, asked him to name the names of protesters and church leaders involved, and made veiled threats to deport him to his native New Zealand, separating him from his wife and family.

The attempt to politicize Loughner's shooting began almost immediately.

Although at first Loughner was erroneously tied to the alleged “hate group” American Renaissance headed by Jared Taylor, Democrats and the mainstream media immediately speculated he was a member of the Tea Party or had been inspired by a political map drawn up by Sarah Palin.

Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik added fuel to this fire, tying the shootings to the political rhetoric of Rush Limbaugh. The talk show king “attacks people,” Dupnik accused, “angers them against government, angers them against elected officials and that kind of behavior in my opinion is not without consequences.”

However, the shooter had long been on the sheriff's radar as mentally unstable.

Far from a right-wing conservative, Jared Loughner held political views characteristic of the 1960s.

One of Loughner’s classmates at Tuscon’s Mountain View High School and Pima Community College described him as “a political radical,” “left-wing, quite liberal,” and “anti-flag.”

Another acquaintance said, “His parents were very laid-back, like hippies. They were live-and-let-live people, but not exactly in a good way, and so he grew up doing more or less what he liked.”

Giffords, despite making great strides in her recovery, announced she was resigning from Congress in 2012.

In November, the 24-year-old Loughner was convicted and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.