WASHINGTON, D.C., April 30, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Sentencing for the homosexual activist who opened fire inside the Family Research Council's headquarters last summer has been postponed until July 15.

Judge Richard W. Roberts had been scheduled to sentence Floyd Lee Corkins II to his prison term on Monday.

But he granted the defense's motion to stall the hearing until they could receive files from the probation office, which Corkins' attorney, David Bos, says will show Corkins was depressed.

Federal prosecutors responded in a memorandum stating: “Although the defendant appears to suffer from bouts of severe depression and unidentified 'psychosis,' there is absolutely nothing to indicate that the defendant did not fully comprehend what he was planning and sought to accomplish in the shooting perpetrated at the FRC.”

Studies, such as one led by Susan Cochran at UCLA in 2009, have found that homosexuals are more than twice as likely to seek treatment for mental health issues and substance abuse than heterosexuals.

Prosecutors said his melancholy is irrelevant to the crime. “The detailed nature of his planning and execution reveal the deliberate and clear-headed manner in which the defendant acted in this case,” they wrote.

Corkins admitted he intended to “kill as many people as possible” at four pro-family organizations in Washington, D.C.

The homosexual activist targeted the organizations after doing extensive research on allegedly anti-gay “hate groups” on the Southern Poverty Law Center's website.

He told investigators he considered making a bomb but did not have the patience to learn how.

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Corkins, who volunteered for a homosexual community center in Virginia, posed as a prospective intern when he entered the building last August 15 with nearly 100 rounds of ammunition and 15 Chick-fil-A sandwiches. He intended to “smear” the sandwiches in his dead victims' faces, because of their support for the Christian fast food chain.

Corkins injured one FRC employee, Leo Johnson. Surveillance footage shows Johnson tackling the shooter after Corkins narrowly missed shooting Leo in the head, then shot him in the arm.

Government prosecutors have asked that Corkins receive 45 years in prison for perpetrating an act of terrorism against Americans holding religious or socially conservative positions on homosexuality and marriage.

“Although the defendant largely failed to bring about the violence he sought, he was still able to accomplish one of his objectives — that is, to use acts of violence to terrorize and intimidate those within the District of Columbia and the United States who did not share his political beliefs and views,” they wrote in their filing.

Traditional Values Coalition President Andrea Lafferty told LifeSiteNews.com that, when she learned her organization was on the shooter's as-yet undisclosed list, she contacted the Obama administration for protection. However, Obama administration officials made no effort to defend her or her employees – indifference that she believes is motivated by her political views.

In February, Corkins vacated his not guilty plea, instead confessing to three charges: one count of committing an act of terrorism with the intent to kill, one count of intent to kill while armed, and one federal count of crossing state lines with guns and ammunition. The government dropped seven additional charges.

FRC President Tony Perkins points to the shooting as an example of the dire consequences of the SPLC's reckless charges. Christian conservatives have said their views, which shaped the history of the United States, do not deserve to be equated with “hate.”

But just one month after the shooting, SPLC President Richard Cohen responded that the FRC “richly deserves the 'hate group' label.”

“Spreading demonizing lies is what is dangerous, not exposing them,” Cohen wrote.