TOPEKA, Kansas, February 24, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Evidence entered into the Phill Kline ethics trial Wednesday revealed that state agencies had received reports of 249 abortions on children under the age of 15 years old between 2001-2003, but that abortion providers, who are mandatory reporters, had sent in only four reports of child sexual abuse.

Tom Williams, Kline’s chief investigator when he was attorney general (and later district attorney), said that he made the discovery in 2003 during a broader effort meant to tackle underreporting of child sexual abuse in the state.

Williams testified to a sworn affidavit, entered into evidence Tuesday, that abortion records from the Kansas Department of Health and Education (KDHE) showed an aggregate 249 “termination of pregnancy” reports on females under 15 years for 2001, 2002, and into 2003. Abortion providers are required by law to send reports to KDHE with statistical information surrounding the abortion (which does not include specific patient information.)

However, they are also required by law to send in sex abuse reports in such cases to the Department of Social and Rehabilitative Services (SRS). But records of child sex abuse reports subpoenaed by Kline’s office in 2003 indicated that over the same time-period, only four reports of child sex abuse had been sent to the SRS.

That same sworn affidavit showed 166 abortions occurred on children 14 years old and younger between 2002-2003. Kline had testified to that particular number on Tuesday, saying that Comprehensive Health Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri (in Johnson County) and George Tiller had each reported only one instance of child sex abuse.

Williams testified that the massive disparity (in the 2001-2003 period) between the KDHE and SRS records was documented on a spreadsheet, and was one of the reasons that prompted AG Phill Kline to launch an investigation into the apparent failure of abortion clinics to fulfill their duties as mandatory reporters.

Williams explained that the process of data-crunching took time, because SRS gave them 19,042 individual reports of child sex abuse. After thoroughly examining them all, and weeding out the duplicates, Williams testified that they boiled it down to 6,797 reports of child sex abuse in Kansas between 2001-2003.

But Williams also added that he was looking into the SRS reports in order to find a pattern of reporting that could “exculpate” providers.

“And I couldn’t find it,” Williams told Kline attorney Mark Stafford on direct examination. He said he even failed to find evidence that could show employees reporting the suspected child rapes.

He pointed to the example of a 10-year-old from California, who received a late-term abortion from abortionist George Tiller at his Wichita Women’s Heath Care (WHC) clinic in Wichita. Although Tiller reported the late-term abortion to KDHE, no report as mandated by law was filed with SRS. Williams said his assistant Jared Reed could not find anything in SRS reports that looked similar or identical to the KDHE record.

Williams later found out that California authorities had apprehended and prosecuted the perpetrator of the crime, but Tiller had nonetheless failed to fulfill his obligations under state law. He said that he never learned the 10-year-old’s identity, but felt that he had the right situation based on the time period.

He also explained that the 10-year-old, had Tiller reported it, “would have been a checkmark in their favor.”

Williams testified that they did not find an “isolated case” of non-reporting, but a pattern of non-compliance by abortion providers like Planned Parenthood and George Tiller.

“If there is a pattern or practice of non-compliance, that is something a prosecutor would want to consider,” Williams said.

More Peter Smith reports on the trial:

* DA’s diary snatching brings new twist to Phill Kline ethics trial, potential crime
* Kansas judge testifies ‘probable cause’ existed to investigate criminal PP activity: Kline Hearings
* Kline did not violate judge’s order in secret Planned Parenthood case: judge’s legal counsel