RICHMOND, VA, October 23, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – When it comes to protecting life, Ken Cuccinelli puts his money where his mouth is.

From 2008 to 2012, he donated $4,038 to crisis pregnancy centers, the alternative counseling centers that often give needy mothers everything from free ultrasounds and medical care to baby formula and diapers.

The largest of three beneficiaries was Divine Mercy Care, part of the Tepeyac Family Center in Fairfax. Cuccinelli donated $2,678 to the group, including $480 in 2012 that is listed as as a “gift other than cash or check.”

Divine Mercy Care notes on its website that in the month of March alone, “54 babies were delivered by Tepeyac Family Center doctors, with four of these new lives delivered through partnerships with pregnancy care organizations/crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs).”

“In 2012, Tepeyac Family Center served over 230 women in need,” with expectant mothers receiving discounts on care ranging from 40 to 100 percent.

The Manassas-based AAA Women for Choice received $1,340 in cash from the gubernatorial candidate, as well as an autographed Gadsden flag – the Tea Party symbol bearing the words “Don't Tread On Me” – that was raffled last April.

The current state attorney general gave another $20 to Expectant Mother Care (EMC) FrontLine Pregnancy Centers located in New York in 2011.

News of Cuccinelli's philanthropy rocketed from left-wing magazine Mother Jones and Ms. Magazine around the left-wing blogosphere.

The abortion lobby has called the pregnancy care centers “controversial” for alerting women to the physical and psychological toll of going through with a pregnancy, accusing them of misleading pregnant women – charges the pro-life movement reciprocates about abortion facilities.

NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia recently released a videotape of “lies that a woman hears when she goes to a CPC” – a list that, according to Human Life International Communications Manager Adam Cassandra, contains zero falsehoods.

The total going to pregnancy care centers amounted to 13 percent of Cuccinelli's overall philanthropic giving, which also includes orphanages in AIDS-ravaged African villages, hunger relief agencies, and a home for special needs children.

The stories also note that Cuccinelli championed Virginia's “Choose Life” license plate. Each license plate provides crisis pregnancy centers with a $15 donation.

But Cuccinelli has done more than raise money for abortion's competitors. As a state Senator, Cuccinelli introduced a bill to defund Planned Parenthood in 2008. The nation's largest abortion provider received a record $542.4 million in taxpayer funds in 2011-2012, more than 45 percent of its total budget.

Planned Parenthood has retaliated by spending more than $1 million against Cuccinelli on one new round of negative advertising alone.

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Cuccinelli is running for governor against Clinton family ally Terry McAuliffe, who has refused to release his full tax returns and made a summary available to The Washington Post only on condition that it not be published.

The summary showed that McAuliffe made $9.5 million in 2012 – more than 48 times as much as Cuccinelli's $194,000 earnings.

McAuliffe has promised to stand like a “brick wall” against abortion regulations, even on late-term abortions.

“This race is our top priority this year, and the stakes couldn’t be higher,” said Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood.

Crisis pregnancy centers, which can hardly afford to make political donations, receive much different treatment from the federal government. Chris Slattery, EMC's president and founder, told LifeSiteNews.com in May that agents of the FBI's Joint Domestic Terrorism Task Force told him they wanted to meet him to establish “a mutually beneficial relationship.”

“In other words, if I don't meet with them, it will not be beneficial for me,” Slattery told LifeSiteNews.com exclusively.

The offer came shortly after New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman subpoenaed the group for not abiding by the standards of a consent agreement that Slattery believed expired more than 20 years ago, as well as a question relating to some of its paperwork.

Matched with a string of official government reports and training seminars, the feds' rate of questioning, alleged surveillance, and baseless prosecution of pro-life activists have led many leaders to conclude the Obama administration is gathering intelligence on the pro-life movement.

For more information on the race, see the websites of Ken Cuccinelli and Terry McAuliffe