LINCOLN, NE, April 22, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A lesbian who carved a cross into her own chest while faking an anti-gay hate crime received seven days in jail, probation, and community service.

Charlie Rogers, a former University of Nebraska women’s basketball star, pleaded “no contest” inside the Lancaster County Courthouse to making a false report.

Last July, a bloodied Rogers crawled to a neighbor's house in the middle of the night. Rogers told Nebraska police that three masked men had broken into her home, bound her with plastic zip ties, carved a cross into her chest and anti-gay slurs into her arms and stomach, spray painted smears onto her walls, then tried to set her house afire.

Her horrifying tale of gaybashing abuse generated sympathy – and fear – in the community. Then the story fell apart.

“The evidence is overwhelming that Charlie Rogers’ narrative of July 22, 2012, was an incredible and outrageous lie the second it passed her lips,” said Judge Gale Pokorny during sentencing.

Lincoln police found the bed where Rogers was allegedly tied and tortured was unruffled and without a spot of blood. FBI pathologist Michelle Elieff concluded the wounds were superficial and self-inflicted. Detectives learned that Rogers had purchased the items used in the alleged assault, and they found DNA that “matched Miss Rogers” inside the white gloves of one of the “perpetrators.”

Police say Rogers invented the gruesome story to gain support for the homosexual political agenda. The “hate crime” took place as the city was debating a gay rights measure, the “Fairness Ordinance.”

Just before the event, Rogers posted on Facebook: “So maybe I am too idealistic, but I believe way deep inside me that we can make things better for everyone. I will be a catalyst. I will do what it takes. I will. Watch me.”

“Ms. Rogers has single-handedly managed to do a disservice to her cause of enormous proportion," Judge Pokorny added. "For a long, long time to come, when a gay makes a legitimate complaint about unequal treatment or discrimination, there will be a knee-jerk reaction among many.”

Pokorny handed down a sentence of seven days in jail, two years probation, and 250 hours of community service. She could have received up to one year in jail. She will enter jail next Monday, April 29.

Pokorny also demanded she get a real job. Rogers, in her mid-30s, currently lives on an allowance from her parents and mows her friends' lawns. “It is time to give up this Peter Pan existence,” he said.

Rogers' attorney, Brett McArthur, said she was looking forward to the community service and said the trial had given his client an enormous amount of stress. “For somebody who's never been through the criminal justice system before it is an incredibly stressful process,” he said.

Judge Pokorny said her plea deprived the community of the chance to heal – and to ask her why she lied in service of a political agenda.