LONDON, February 10, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A sexually explicit music video sponsored by abortion giant Marie Stopes International is promoting anal sex as a contraceptive option for teens.

“Rule of thumb, one up the bum and it’s no harm done.  One up the bum and you won’t be a mum,” says one line in the risqué ‘safe sex’ video by comic rap group, The Midnight Beast, entitled “Use ya Head.”

Anal sex is strongly linked to many dangerous and deadly diseases, including HPV, Syphilis, Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and Herpes.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have outlined the grave risks of anal sex, especially the potential of contracting HPV.  “It is estimated that about 1,600 new cases of HPV-associated anal cancer are diagnosed in women and about 900 are diagnosed in men each year in the United States.”

The video, sponsored by Marie Stopes, questions the audience in 1980’s style rap “do you or don’t you, use your head when you go to bed?”  It goes on to spell out “condoms,” “implant,” and “contraception” as necessary prerogatives to “going to bed.”

It has received over 117,600 YouTube views to date and links young viewers directly to a site, havealarc.com, outlining contraception options – all sponsored by Marie Stopes International.

Marie Stopes has defended the video, saying it raises awareness of condoms and contraception in “a fun way.”  “This tongue-in-cheek approach leads young people to a website with all the information and contact details they need to make informed lifestyle choices,” they said.

Marie Stopes International is one of the world’s largest international abortion groups, and receives an estimated £30 million a year from the UK’s National Health Service.

They made headlines last year after running abortion ads on British TV.  The organization claimed that the ads were needed to “inform” women and help them “confront the taboo” surrounding abortion. 

Marie Stopes also came under fire after the recent deaths of woman in one of their abortion facilities in Nepal last year, and a 15-year-old girl at another facility in 2009 in the UK.