WASHINGTON, D.C., January 21, 2013, (LifeSiteNews.com) – In his second inaugural address, President Barack Obama hailed a riot in which homosexual rioters, some dressed in drag, pelted police officers with bottles and attempted to set them on fire for raiding a mafia-controlled gay bar.

“We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths – that all of us are created equal – is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall,” the president said just after noon today. 

The Stonewall Riots took place on June 28, 1969, after plainclothes New York police officers raided a rundown gay establishment, which the Mafia ran without a liquor license, on morals charges.

Slightly after 1 a.m., the Greenwich Village streets around the Stonewall Inn filled with homosexuals, who pelted police with bottles. They slashed police car tires, attempted to overturn cars, and chased the police back inside the bar.

“We had maybe six people and by this time there were several thousand outside,” remembered Seymour Pine, a deputy inspector with the Morals Division, who led the bust. “The other side was coming like it was a real war. And that's what it was, it was a war…It was as bad as any situation that I had met in during the army.”

When not threatening police, the crowd confronted them, chanting: "We are the Stonewall girls/ We wear our hair in curls/ We don't wear underwear/ We show our pubic hairs."

Their actions, though, were deadly serious.

“Our goal was to hurt those police,” said rioter John O'Brien. “I wanted to kill those cops for the anger I had in me...It gives back a little of the terror they gave in my life.”

The protesters – joined by Black Panthers and antiwar protesters – broke the windows, then burst through the door.

Howard Smith, a reporter with The Village Voice who was holed up inside the bar with the police and several homosexuals, saw lighter fluid sprayed inside the establishment.

“I actually thought, as all of them did, that we were going to be killed,” he said.

By morning, much of the establishment had been burned or wrecked.

Sporadic hostilities continued for days, culminating in the formation of the Gay Liberation Front.

“Sections of the GLF would go on to organize solidarity for arrested Black Panthers, collect money for striking workers, and link the battle for gay rights to the banner of socialism,” wrote Lionel Wright, a homosexual Socialist Party leader.

One year later – June 28, 1970 – homosexual activists organized the first gay pride parade.

At the time, the actions were controversial. Longtime homosexual activist Randy Wicker called the riots “disorderly, and tacky, and cheap.”

Today's LGBT activists consider the riot the beginning of the modern homosexual movement.

In June 2009, President Obama celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall riots by inviting homosexual leaders to a meeting in the East Wing of the White House. 

His cadences today placed the event on par with two other uprisings.

The Selma to Montgomery march for black civil rights took place in March 1965. The Seneca Falls Convention helped launch the women's suffrage movement. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who organized the event, condemned “murder of children, either before or after birth.“

President Obama touted the homosexual agenda, including marriage redefinition, at numerous points during the inaugural festivities. Saying its aims are an integral part of American “freedom,” he called on citizens to “answer the call of history and carry into an uncertain future that precious light of freedom.”

 “As much as I don't like to say it, there's a place for violence,” Tommy Lanigan-Schmidt, who helped lead the assault on police at Stonewall, told PBS. “And as awful as people might think that sounds, it's the way history has always worked.”