NEW YORK, January 6, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) - A program touted as “a bold, nationwide, social change effort” is being launched by Planned Parenthood to alter family dialogue about sexuality and encourage parents to ease their children’s transition into a sexually active lifestyle.

Entitled “Real Life. Real Talk,” the program was first used in Connecticut, New York, Maine, and Arizona between 2004 and 2008, and its nationwide distribution is now being funded by groups that include the Ford Foundation.

The stated goal of the program is “to positively change the social climate in communities” with “more open, honest, and balanced talk” about sex; it targets parents and guardians of children as young as 8 years old.

“A more positive social climate will, over time, help to ensure that people — particularly young people — have adequate information and services to enable them to make healthy sexual choices,” states Planned Parenthood, noting that “getting people to talk openly ... about ... sensitive or stigmatized” issues is always “a critical step in making social change happen.”

The program teaches parents to promote communication and “clear up slang” regarding such topics as oral sex and masturbation, and to help children navigate the sexually active lifestyle by “point[ing] out…condoms” in the drugstore and providing other forms of contraception.

“Take your teen to a clinic for contraception and exams, or let your teen know where to go for help to prepare to be sexually active,” advises the document. In conclusion, the group expects that “a cascade of positive behavior change in sexual health will follow” from the program.

Planned Parenthood’s own website offers examples on how to educate teenagers on navigating sexual activity, including anal sex and masturbation. The page entitled “all about the anus” is visible as of publishing from the site’s search page, although it is no longer directly accessible.

The abortion group also elaborates on its philosophy for sexual behavior in children in the parental section of the website, where it educates parents on how to assess their children’s sexuality in a hierarchy of needs.

At the very foundation of a pyramid of all human needs lies “needs of the body,” which Planned Parenthood describes as including sexual satisfaction, and whose sexual aspect should involve even the smallest infants: “We couldn’t live without nutritious food, clean water and air, and regular sleep. We also need to feel good about our bodies and our sexuality, and take pleasure in them.

“We need to give babies a sense of themselves, their sexuality, and their bodies from birth.”

Planned Parenthood goes on to explain that babies who masturbate should not be discouraged, or else they will become “ashamed” of their sexuality and “may not trust us later in life when they need guidance about sex and sexuality.” In a list of “realistic goals” for meeting a child’s “bodily needs,” parents are encouraged to “acknowledge that my child is a sexual being.”

Elsewhere, the organization instructs parents to tell children up to the age of five that “it’s normal to touch one’s sex organs for pleasure” and “to seek privacy” when doing so. Children up to the age of seven should be told “that people experience sexual pleasure in a number of different ways.”

The theory that children are sexual from birth was spearheaded by Alfred Kinsey, the “father of the sexual revolution,” who in the 1930s and 40s tested his hypothesis by measuring “orgasms” in hundreds of molested children, some as young as two months old. One victim of Kinsey’s experiments, which were carried out with the help of several pedophiles, spoke out against her abuse in a WorldNetDaily interview in October.

In June, outraged parents made national news after a Planned Parenthood class in Southwest Iowa taught young teenagers sexual positions.