December 6, 2012 (LifeSiteNews.com) – How could she get pregnant while using what is touted as a practically fool-proof method of contraception? That’s what a woman writing at the pro-abortion website RHRealityCheck.com wants to know.

In a post suffused with anguish, the woman, writing under the initials NW, expresses her bewilderment at the failure of her Intrauterine Device (IUD), and describes the process that led her to “fix” the problem by having her child aborted.

“I just had the quite bizarre experience of getting pregnant,” begins NW’s article. “Bizarre because for the last two and a half years, I’ve had the Paraguard IUD - as effective as tying your tubes, they tell me.”

At first, NW says, she couldn’t believe she was pregnant. It wasn’t until she was staring at the positive pregnancy test that the truth began to sink in.  Even then she refused to believe it, and took another test. And another. Finally, she went to the doctor, who confirmed what she already knew: she was pregnant.

After some discussion with her boyfriend, NW decided to schedule an abortion with Planned Parenthood the following Saturday.

“When I put down the phone I’m hit with a wave of relief…Something went wrong, but now there are steps to fix it,” she writes.

“But,” she continues, “that still leaves a week of being pregnant.”

The sensations of being pregnant were more than NW bargained for, and she writes that during the moments she experienced nausea or a loss of appetite at work, she was hit with the truth that no one else knew: “There’s another person growing in this room.”

At the same time, during an ultrasound she looks at the screen and says, “What the hell are you? You aren’t a person yet.”

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On the morning of the day of the abortion, NW suddenly wanted to discuss the possibility of keeping the baby with her boyfriend. But ultimately she decided that “we’re not there yet.”

“I want us to be sure without a faulty copper wire forcing our hand,” she writes.

After the abortion NW spent the day at home with her boyfriend. “And then,” she says, “it’s Sunday and I’m not pregnant any more…My boyfriend works on a paper due that night. I chat about authors and law school. And life goes on.”

While pro-abortion activists routinely claim that increased use of contraception will decrease abortion rates, pro-life advocates have argued that the data points to the opposite conclusion. The solution to the high abortion rate, they say, is not increased contraception, but rather to educate people on responsible sexual behavior.

According to Brian Clowes, a researcher with Human Life International, NW’s experience is all too common. “This story is about only one of the nearly two and a half million contraceptive failures that occur in the United States each year,” said Clowes, “and nearly half of these end in abortion. 

“Women (and men) have been conditioned to use devices that just do not do what they are billed to do - prevent pregnancy” he said. He pointed out that “when our pills or IUDs or condoms fail, we feel entitled to ‘fix’ the problem with abortion.”

“Contraception has made us spiritually and emotionally lazy,” he said.

The comments under NW’s article suggest that her experience is not an isolated one.

“I, too, thought that I was safe with Paragard, but after 5 years (it is supposed to last 10), I became pregnant with my third child,” wrote one commenter, who said, however, that she decided the baby was “meant to be” and gave birth to her.

The same commenter said that she conceived her first child while she was on the pill. “I wish there were better, safer, and more effective options than abstinence and getting your tubes tied,” she said.

Another woman echoed the same experience, saying she became pregnant while using the IUD some 40 years ago.

Another recounted how she performed an abortion on a woman with an IUD two days earlier. She insisted that IUD’s are effective, just not “perfect.”

A different commenter protested that IUDs are 99 percent effective, to which another explained in response: “What birth control producers mean when they say 99% effective is that if 100 women have sex for 1 year using that particular form of BC, only 1 will get pregnant. Therefore if you account for the fact that women don’t only have sex for one year, the risk is actually slightly higher than 1% of women still getting pregnant.”

One study released in 2011 showed that in Spain, the abortion rate rose in proportion to the availability of contraception, a result that confused the researchers who expected to find the opposite result.

In response, Dr. Dianne Irving, a bioethicist at Georgetown University and a former bench biochemist with the U.S.‘s National Institutes of Health, said that “years of scientific studies around the world” have established the link between contraception and abortion.

“Since it is…a long-recognized and documented scientific fact that almost all so-called ‘contraceptives’ routinely fail at statistically significant rates resulting in ‘unplanned pregnancies’, is there any wonder that elective abortions are socially required in order to take care of such ‘accidents’?” asked Dr. Irving. “Thus abortion has become a ‘contraceptive’ in and of itself.”