March 6, 2012 (LifeSiteNews.com) - Spanish prosecutors are seeking 309 years in prison for Spain’s infamous “abortion mogul” Carlos Morin, for over one hundred crimes related to illegal abortions, according to reports in the Spanish media.

Morin was arrested and accused of numerous crimes in 2007, after journalists and pro-life groups revealed that late-term abortions were being performed in his clinics with fabricated proofs for risks to the “psychological health” of patients. The bodies of the aborted babies were being ground up in industrial strength food processors and flushed into the sewer system.

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Morin served two months in jail after which he was released pending the outcome of his trial. Pro-lifers were outraged in 2009 when the Barcelona Medical College (COMB) restored him to good standing in the organization after having suspended him for lack of dues. However, the terms of Morin’s release prevented him from practicing abortions again.

According to Spain’s Thomas More Center for Juridical Studies, MorĂ­n currently stands accused of 115 charges of illegal abortions, a number that is “substantially reduced” from its original, due to changes to the country’s abortion law in 2010, permitting abortion-on-demand during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Morin’s trial, which he will share with 11 other defendants, is scheduled to begin on September 14 and will last two-and-a-half months. It has been in preparation for six years. More than 115 witnesses will be called to testify.  The Thomas More Center believes that through its proceedings “Spanish society will discover, once and for all, the sordid reality of abortion, the death of thousands of innocent children every year, the violence carried out against defenseless women, and the illegal use of medical science not to cure, but to kill.”

Morin is called Spain’s “abortion mogul” because he owns several chains of abortion facilities and is one of the largest abortion providers in Europe.  His abortion empire’s lax standards for killing unborn children made Morin’s facilities popular with foreigners seeking to escape their own country’s laws. If he is convicted, it will be the second time during his career as an abortionist: he first served time for abortion-related crimes in 1989.

During an investigative report by Danish reporters in 2006, Morin was told that “some of the abortions that you do here are of fetuses that could survive outside of the womb.”

“I’m not a philosopher, I’m not here to wonder if a baby would breathe or not,” Morin answered, and added “take your morality and keep it. You can have your morality, and I can have mine. I don’t have anything to do with your morality.”