RENO, NV, October 22, 2012, (LifeSiteNews.com) – Sandra Fluke, the Georgetown activist who famously testified in favor of the HHS birth control mandate, drew less than a dozen people while campaigning for President Obama in the swing state of Nevada.

According to the Reno Gazette-Journal, Fluke “spoke Saturday in front of about 10 people at the Sak ‘N Save in north Reno.”

“I’m trying to do everything I can for an election that I feel is very important. I have a unique opportunity for how I get to do that,” said Fluke, who has stumped for the president in other battleground states including Colorado, Iowa, New Hampshire, and Florida. 

The crowds have steadily diminished ever since Fluke spoke in prime time at this year’s Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Democrats catapulted the Georgetown Law student and left-wing activist into the limelight after Republicans barred her from addressing a House Oversight Committee hearing on religious liberty, a subject in which she lacks competence. Her exclusion led Virginia Democrat Gerald Connolly to charge the clergy who testified with being “complicit in the trampling of freedom.” 

(Click “like” if you want to end abortion! )

Supporters of the mandate claimed that no women testified before the hearing, despite the fact that Dr. Laura Champion and Dr. Allison Garrett both testified. Nancy Pelosi later had Fluke testify about the necessity of free contraception before a smaller gathering of House Democrats.

“Without insurance coverage, contraception can cost a woman over $3,000 during law school,” Fluke said. She later admitted that she didn’t realize that contraceptives were available for $9 a month at Target, including the Target down the street from Georgetown.

Although Sandra Fluke is often portrayed as a victim, she confided to the crowd of ten in Nevada, “I get people writing to me and things like that. I haven’t had any negative in-person situations, thank goodness.”

Her recent appearance suggests in-person situations may be increasingly hard to come by.