WASHINGTON, D.C., July 10, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A feminist writer for Slate has said that “pro-choice” women should stop apologizing for having abortions of convenience and express their joy at being free of responsibilities.

Jessica Grose wrote “Enough With the Grueling, Wrenching, 'I Had an Abortion' Essays” on Tuesday, critiquing a recent spate of articles defending abortions women had undertaken in difficult circumstances.

“A lot of women have abortions and don’t look back. A lot of women don’t want a baby, and they don’t care whether the fetus is viable or how much money is in their bank account. Where are their essays?” Grose asked.

Grose, the former editor of the website Jezebel, saluted “blithe and unapologetic” stories of abortions for abortion's sake. She cited the words of the anonymous 23-year-old author of “What to Expect When You’re Aborting” as a perfect example of her preferred abortive autobiography:

By monday my hormones were a little wonky but in all i just felt like this parasitic creature that burrowed its way into me and fed of my energy, apetite, [sic] and joy was removed. And I had been restored.

“Humane essays aren’t going to change the entrenched anti-choicer.” Instead, they “push the rhetorical battle even further rightward,” she claimed.

Grose's tactic came one day after the New York Times carried Beth Matusoff Merfish piece on “My Mother's Abortion,” which Grose felt was unduly soft-spoken.

The Slate piece is the most recent but far from the first plea for post-abortive feminists to share tales of uplifting, empowering terminations.

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S.E. Smith at the website xoJane.com wrote that she chose to wear my abortion on my sleeve” so other women would know, “If you had an abortion, you can rock on with your bad self.” She implored other women to follow her lead. Several have.

Jessica DelBalzo wrote that women should “venerate” abortion “wholeheartedly” in her essay, “I Love Abortion: Implying Otherwise Accomplishes Nothing for Women’s Rights” for the website RH Reality Check.

DelBalzo, an outspoken opponent of adoption, had previously expressed gratitude for her “euphoric” abortion experience in an essay entitled, “My Happy Abortion” for the same website.

Upon rising from the abortion table, “I unsuccessfully attempted to repress the huge grin that had developed on my face,” she wrote.

She concluded, “I regret but one thing: that by the time my daughter is in the position to need an abortion, factions of fanatical, misogynistic conservatives may have eliminated her right to choose.”

Just last month The New York Times carried a story by former Seattle City Council member Judy Nicastro, who wrote that she was “grateful” her abortion let her son die “in a warm and loving place.”

In April, a caller named “Karel” told Montreal-based talk show host Isabelle Maréchal that she had aborted her unborn child at 26 weeks for no good reason. “I don't regret it, to be honest with you,” she said.

Last July an anonymous woman named “Jane Young” posted pictures of her 2011 abortion on a website “to counter the perverse use of dead fetus images used by the anti-abortion movement.”

Perhaps drawing from such stories, “Dear Abby” advice columnist Jeanne Phillips responded to a letter by saying, “Ultimately, I am told, most women feel a sense of relief after an abortion.”

Yet the evidence continues to accumulate that abortion is anything but a cherished experience for most women.

For many, the guilt leads to a psychological breaking point. Numerous studies have confirmed a link between abortion, depression, and suicide. A team of Chinese researchers from Anhui Medical College found last year that post-abortive women were 49 percent more likely to experience depression.

A 2008 study by the University of Oslo concluded, “Young adult women who undergo induced abortion may be at increased risk for subsequent depression.”

In 2005, Finland’s National Research and Development Center for Welfare and Health (STAKES) studied the deaths of all women of reproductive age over a 13-year period (1987-2000). It found deaths from suicide, accidents and homicide are 248 percent higher in the year following an abortion, while women who had given birth in the past year had the lowest likelihood of death.

Ministries that help post-abortive women escape the cycle of depression and find peace and healing following the decision to end their child's life include the Silent No More Awareness Campaign,  Operation Outcry, and Project Rachel.