Planned Parenthood of North Texas, er, uh, Greater Texas, wants you to know it’s got plenty of money and plenty of funding, so you can probably put your money into actual health clinics in the state that need money to help poor people. (Okay, probably they don’t want you to know that last part.)

The abortion provider, referrer and promoter who in the midst of losing its funding from the state of Texas because Texas pulled funding from any facility doing abortions, has merged three of its large affiliates into one giant affiliate,  effective Saturday, September 1, now known as Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas, which some say is a sign of troubled times, but which Planned Parenthood assures us in a recent New York Times  article proves they are just fine:

“We will be a $30 million organization with no debt and reserves. I believe we will be able to raise even more with a balance sheet that strong,” said Ken Lambrecht, the current head of Planned Parenthood of North Texas, who will be the Dallas-based president and chief executive of the new operation when the merger takes effect in September. “Already, funders are lining up, recognizing this new strength we bring to the table, to help us weather the storm.”

This should be great news for them then, so it’s a mystery how they can be spending so much time and money fighting the decision made in Texas to not give funds to any organization that does abortions. However, the story reports they will still lose money, such as the $3 million in North Texas. But they have so much more. The Times story says:

They have been around for roughly 75 years, they do not have debt, they have cash reserves, and they own many of their buildings across the region. With headquarters in Dallas, the new organization taps into North Texas’ old-money fund-raising families, including some prominent Republican women who have maintained their allegiance to Planned Parenthood.

The merged organization, budgeting for roughly $24.5 million in private donations, fundraising events, and client fees in 2013, is already rolling out the latest in electronic health records technology. And it absorbs the fruits of the North Texas branch’s recent five-year capital campaign, including an Addison health center that tripled in size with a recent relocation and a new $6.5 million health care clinic, administrative facility and abortion clinic under construction in Fort Worth.

Wow, that’s a lot of money Planned parenthood gets from a lot of sources that don’t include the state of Texas. So, why would this rich organization with no debt and a plethora of funders need to take money from the state when Texas is filled with rural community health clinics that could use the money to treat real health problems, offer actual mammograms, or serve low income women who can’t afford to travel to larger cities? Planned Parenthood has been explaining how the merging of a huge part of the state only shows their abundance. If that’s the case, then that’s only a further indication that Gov. Rick Perry and the Texas legislature made the right decision in pulling money from them, not that it was specifically about them. It was about places that take public funding and also perform abortions. The old argument that that money isn’t actually used for abortions is the deepest hogwash in the state of Texas. Because getting money for one function frees up more for another, all public money still helps make abortion possible.

So, as the North Texas, Austin and Waco affiliates merge into a $29 million annually and 28 center “mega-organization,” as the Times calls it, Planned Parenthood proves it doesn’t really need your money because as it says, it has tons of it. And construction continues on the new Fort Worth Planned Parenthood, which sits next to an adoption center. This picture, taken by our chapter leaders, Ed and Maranda Gomes from Bound4LIFE Grand Prairie, on August 25 shows that even without taxpayer money, they go on.

Sadly, abortion is a profitable business, and it’s what Planned Parenthood does best (worst).

Reprinted with permission from Bound4Life.com.