WASHINGTON, D.C., December 8, 2010 (LifeSiteNews.com) - Every day in America, countless packages are carefully transferred for use by government, university, pharmaceutical and other biotechnology laboratories. Some of these end up advancing development of products such as cosmetics and food additives; others are used directly as a form of therapy.

The material in those packages are human body parts - eyes, ears, limbs, brain, skin - now an indispensable commodity for many U.S. researchers and scientists, and a lucrative export of America’s abortion clinics.

To see an example of an order form for fetal body parts, click here.

Dr. Theresa Deisher, a molecular and cellular physiologist and an internationally-recognized expert in regenerative medicine, explored the routine “commoditizing” of unborn human beings in modern biotechnology in a speech in Washington, DC on Friday. Deisher is Managing Member and Research and Development Director at AVM Biotechnology, and has several years’ experience as a commercial scientist at top pharmaceutical companies. Her work has led to dozens of patented medical breakthroughs.

Historically, when man wants to exploit other men, “what we first have to do is alter our way of thinking about them, and then of course we actually have to dehumanize them, and we usually do that by denying them a soul: so therefore they’re not actually human like the rest of us,” Deisher told an audience at the “50 Years of the Pill” conference hosted by Human Life International of America.

This, she explained, is precisely the scenario with the smallest human lives in medical research today - and not just embryos, but unborn children of all trimesters - whose body parts grow more valuable as they mature.

She noted that an article in the Puget Sound Business Journal discovered that the University of Washington filled out more than 4,400 requests for fresh fetal body parts from fetal tissue for the purpose of biomedical research in 2009, the first time hard numbers of such transactions were uncovered.

“It has to be approved by an institutional review board, so they think they’re applying ethics to this because they reviewed the use of this,” said Deisher. “What do you think that relationship might have to do with doctors encouraging abortions?” She estimates that as many as 1.87 million such transactions - requesting individual body parts such as eyes and liver - could happen each year in America.

The scientist also noted that plenty of scientific literature, available on the Internet, discusses the optimal age for a child’s death in order to obtain useful body parts: one such professional noted that the best heart tissue is obtained from a child of 22 weeks’ gestation.

In addition to research, Deisher said the bodies of unborn children are being used “as not only biomedical research tools, but as actual medical therapies.” “Fetuses 12, 14, 16, 18 weeks gestation are ground up and their cells are implanted in people who have had strokes or Parkinson’s disease,” she said.

Another ethical battlefield involves the use of cell lines derived from aborted children. Contrary to popular belief, today’s fetal stem cell lines derive from not one, but several abortions - many of them in the second trimester - and will have to be replaced with fresh victims as they are only useful for about 30 to 35 years, said the scientist.

Fetal cell line vaccines such as measles-mumps-rubella, chicken pox, and hepatitis A are not only morally problematic, said Deisher, but their use has a dramatic correlation with an epidemic on the rise: autism.

When examining the points at which autism diagnosis mysteriously spiked in the U.S., said Deisher, “the only thing that is associated with these change points is the introduction of a fetal cell vaccine.” She said the correlation even holds true for the U.S., Canada, Great Britain, Wales, Denmark, Japan, and southeastern Asian countries: “in every country we have looked at, they have different change points, every one is associated with an aborted fetal event.” No other variable, she said, has correlated so closely to the pattern of autism diagnosis.

Deisher blamed such commercialization, in part, on the growing tendency to see children as “a choice rather than a blessing,” due to technology controlling fertility such as the hormonal birth control pill.

“From that point, it was pretty easy for us to begin looking at children as a material thing, a new car or a mansion, a commodity,” she said.