HOLLYWOOD, September 21, 2012, (LifeSiteNews.com)—The Mob Doctor, the new medical drama on Fox, is such a derivative work I’m tempted to post a review of another program. The paint-by-numbers potboiler throws all Hollywood’s conventions into creating a thoroughly forgetful program unremarkable for anything – except its outspoken advocacy for abortion in its pilot episode.

The new series, which debuted this Monday, substitutes focus group-tested safety for creativity. Take a gusty heroine who is equal parts tenderhearted philanthropist and iron-fisted avenger; mix in medical issues; throw in a mafia plot line, sexual tension with a colleague, and an irritating mother who does not understand the joys of commitment-free sex. Then sandwich liberalism between pumping music and hazy-but-rapid scene transitions.

All that remains, in the words of The Simpsons, is to “be dangerous-but-warm and edgy-cute.”

Even the protagonist’s name, Grace Devlin, is an artificial construct – a little angel, a little devil. Get it?

The writers bring equal subtlety to their ham-fisted insertion of abortion propaganda into the pilot episode.

Devlin (Jordana Spiro) is a sympathetic character as a doctor who has offered her services to the mafia to save her brother’s life. This lends unearned credibility to her advice when she learns that one of her boyfriend’s patients is a family friend in trouble. Susie DeMarco, 14, is pregnant despite the fact that she and her boyfriend, Johnny, have never had sex. (“I’m not stupid,” she says.)

After learning she became a mother after having “outercourse”, Susie turns to her trusted friend in despair. “Grace, my dad is gonna kill Johnny,” she cries. “And I have a swimming scholarship next year to St. Catherine’s. If I’m knocked up, I lose it. What do I do?”

Having established Susie as a brilliant, hard-working, 14-year-old Catholic girl who hasn’t even had sex, the screenwriters reveal through Grace that “her dad works at the state penn”; “they don’t have a dollar to their name”; and “that scholarship is her one shot at making something out of her life.” To further reduce the audience’s objections Grace’s boyfriend, Dr. Brett Robinson (Zach Gilford), announces it is a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and the baby is “non-viable.”

The only problem left? Susie’s father has to sign a parental consent form.

The thought so enrages Grace’s sense of justice that she insists (she never suggests anything) that her boyfriend lie about the procedure, trick Mr. DeMarco into signing a form he has not read, then have another doctor falsify hospital records.

When Brett betrays the notion that he might have an independent will, Grace explodes that she must allow a 14-year-old middle school child to have an abortion behind her parents’ back.

“It gives her options, and you’re standing in her way,” she screams. “I don’t think you’re empathizing enough.”

(Click “like” if you want to end abortion! )

Eventually, Dr. Robinson goes through with the ruse, saving Susie from the backlash of a character who is presented as nothing other than a loving and devoted father.

The episode closes with a soliloquy about “choice” and the revelation that she was relieved to discover the corpse of her drunken, abusive father. “Finding him dead, it meant we were safe,” she said. Just the way a dead baby means Susie and Johnny are “safe,” presumably.

Thus did Hollywood try to stuff its opposition to parental consent laws down the nation’s collective throat, with a series of devices as tired as the rest of the series. The most sympathetic, angelic child will land on skid row if heartless, theocratic laws are enforced. Grace is a crusader and rescuer, trying to save her brother from a vicious mob boss who wants to kill him and a 14-year-old girl.

Only Brett seems to grasp the situation when he tells Grace, “You’re a bad influence.” Smiling suggestively, he said, “You’ll make it up to me.”

But who will make up 60 lost minutes to the viewer?

The episode might have one beneficial side effect its writers did not intend: It exposes the lies of Planned Parenthood and other pro-abortion organizations that vouch for the safety of “outercourse.”

Planned Parenthood – which has a vested interest in getting adolescents sexually active as early as possible – calls outercourse “safe, effective, and convenient,” as well as “a great method of birth control” that “has no side effects.” Four stars! To make the practice of near-sex more accessible yet, the website has a how-to section. 

The Association of Reproductive Health Professionals presents outercourse as virtually the equivalent of abstinence. “Both abstinence and outercourse are free, always available, and have no side effects,” the ARHP lies. “To prevent pregnancy and [sexually transmitted diseases], you must use abstinence or outercourse all of the time.”

The ARHP’s contention-by-silence that herpes or HPV cannot be transmitted through genital contact is novel, to say the least.

Both websites recount that bodily fluids may be exchanged during the process, carrying a reduced chance of pregnancy or infection, but both drown this significant qualification out with misleading, blanket statements like those above.

The episode’s saving, well, grace may be that it helped young people realize Planned Parenthood and the abortion lobby are shameless liars. While Spiro said in an interview that her character possesses a certain “godliness,” this is not what she meant.

The show’s clumsy pro-abortion propaganda is but one of the numerous failings, coincidentally the one largely overlooked by critics. TV.com notes, “Grace comes off as a rather unlikeable hypocrite.” The Los Angeles Times calls the program “uncomfortable to watch.” Perhaps the best line belongs to Gail Pennington of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, who wrote, “‘The Mob Doctor’ is going to have to get lots better to be mediocre…it would take The Godfather to pull me back in.” 

These are but a handful of a plethora of negative reviews.

Even the series’ co-creator, Josh Berman admitted, “It almost sounds like we’re just trying to…marry two formulas to create one new formula.”

Lucky for him the only place more disconnected from reality than The Mob Boss is Hollywood, where Berman – who has a track record of failure for Fox – will doubtless be rewarded with more opportunities to lecture and bore the public. 

This series should swim with the fishes.

This article originally appeared on TheRightsWriter.com and is reprinted with permission.