Updated Jan. 16th 7:25 a.m.: While organizer Dylan Tower appeared to argue that the event is not an orgy because it will be consensual, LifeSiteNews acknowledges that that was an interpretation of his remarks and so has updated the story to allow readers to judge for themselves.

TORONTO, Jan. 15, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A student group affiliated with the University of Toronto Student Union is planning an “epic student sex club adventure” next week, but they insist it’s not an orgy.

The event is meant to introduce students to the “sex club scene.” Clothes become “optional” at 6 p.m., according to the ad, so “you can get naked with all your new friends.”

The Toronto Sexual Education Centre, which is funded by a 25 cent levy from U of T students, has rented out for the day the Oasis Aqua Lounge, a sex club billing itself as a “water-themed adult playground,” where – according to the Toronto Star – “sex is allowed everywhere but the hot tub.”

Dylan Tower, one of the organizers, insists the group is “not funding an orgy.”

“People are allowed to have sex on premise,” he told the Star. “There is not any type of ‘You should be having sex when you’re here.’ It’s very much, come and enjoy the space, there’s no prodding or pushing in that direction.”

In a follow-up interview with Maclean's Tuesday night, Tower said that at last year's event only four people, two couples, out of 80 attendees actually had sex. Asked how the "adventure" is different than an orgy, he said, "it’s not a planned group sex event; it’s an event where you are able to have sex on the premises."

Despite organizers’ promises to provide “safer sex” supplies like condoms, critics said the event is clearly not safe.

“University is a time when young adults are most vulnerable to sexual exploitation,” said Shantel Josee, a masters student and spokesperson for Campaign Life Coalition.

She said an event like this “only reveals the tragic outcomes of a misled sex-craved society, which will go to any lengths to fulfill physical needs.”

“Fruitful education on sexuality is not ‘hands-on’ as SEC wishes to endorse,” she continued. “It is not the act of sex that needs to be taught or experienced, but the holistic approach to sexuality which involves love, not of just your partner but also love of self.”

“The ‘safety’ of condoms and sanitation does not protect a fragile society from the grotesque harm of a false idea of sexuality.”

“Why is the university allowing this?” asked Gwen Landolt, national vice-president of REAL Women, a pro-family NGO dedicated to promoting the dignity of women. “Universities are meant to educate and enlighten, not to provide centres for self-abuse, which is really what it is.”

She said such an event is “a degradation of the whole purpose of sex.” Sex without commitment, she said, is “not harmless psychologically or physically, regardless of one’s views on morality.”

A spokesperson for the University of Toronto told LifeSiteNews they would not “censor” the event, citing their policy on the recognition of campus groups, and emphasized that it's not being organized by the university.

“The University will not attempt to censor, control or interfere with any group on the basis of its philosophy, beliefs, interests or opinions expressed, unless and until these lead to activities which are illegal or which infringe the rights and freedoms," he said, quoting the policy.

The spokesperson noted that the 25 cent levy for the centre is "fully refundable" if students choose to opt out.

LifeSiteNews.com did not hear back from the student union by press time.