Patrick Craine

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Could this year’s March for Life be bigger than Obama’s inauguration?

Patrick Craine
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Every four years, DC’s annual March for Life follows mere days after a presidential inauguration.

Based on past numbers, we might expect the March to be a mere blip in comparison, and certainly it is in the eyes of the media, which loves to ignore it. In 2009, Obama’s inauguration drew an estimated 1.8 million while the March for Life attracted around 200,000.

Still, with support for the March growing every year and Obama’s popularity waning, could it be that this year’s March for Life on Jan. 25th might actually be larger than Obama’s Jan. 21st inauguration?

The Washington Examiner seems to think it’s a possibility. Paul Bedard writes:

The march, expected to attract tens of thousands more than the record 400,000 two years ago, could rival President Obama’s Inauguration Day crowd, propelled by the growing youth support of efforts to overturn Roe v. Wade, which the president has embraced with open arms. Obama drew 1.8 million in 2009. Just 600,000 are expected January 21st.

One critical sign of how big the march will be: Hotels pre-booked for participants sold out a month ago while many Washington hotels report lukewarm interest for rooms during the Inauguration. In 2009, hotels sold out months in advance as an excited nation readied to welcome the first black president.

Whether or not the March is actually larger, the fact that an annual rally could rival an event like the inauguration is certainly a major feat for pro-life organizers.

The events surrounding the March for Life start Jan. 24th with youth rallies and prayer vigils, and the main rally is on Jan. 25th on the National Mall beginning at 12:00 p.m. Get a full schedule of events here.

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Vatican’s ‘climate change’ light show skipped the most endangered species of all – the unborn child

John-Henry Westen John-Henry Westen Follow John-Henry

December 8, 2015 (LifeSiteNews) – I just watched the rather spectacular light show at the Vatican featuring some of the most dazzling graphics imaginable broadcast onto the façade and dome of St. Peter’s Basilica.  It’s hard to criticize something with so much artistry and beauty. It was a parade of the most endangered species and habitats on the planet in bright color and an impressive sound track to accompany it.

One of the big problems, of course, is that it’s an inappropriate venue for such a show. Just as you wouldn’t store coloring books in the tabernacle or use a chalice to drink your coffee, the façade of a Church consecrated to the worship of God is not the place for a – albeit beautiful – work of political advocacy.

Even if we ignore the difficulty of mixing the sacred with the profane and we turn to the message itself, how could the Catholic Church countenance a display of the world’s endangered animals and habitats and fail to include the most endangered of all – the unborn child?  The habitat of the womb, which was revered as a sacred place of nourishment and care, has become one of the most deadly places on the planet. Wanton dismemberment of innocent human beings takes place by the tens of millions around the globe each year.

STORY: Vatican, World Bank partner to launch Year of Mercy with St. Peter’s ‘climate change’ light show

But those endangered lives, and that habitat, does not fit within the agenda of the Vatican’s partners in the climate change push.  The World Bank, the major financial backer of the venture, is actually on the other side, pushing for the extinction of the right to life for unborn children and to make the habitat of the womb forever hostile to the inviolable protection for God’s children being knit together in the wombs of their mothers.

As the Year of Mercy launches with this show, it makes me wonder if we’re testing God’s mercy rather than celebrating it.



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Watch for yourself: Video of Pope Francis’ remarks on condoms

John-Henry Westen John-Henry Westen Follow John-Henry

December 2, 2015 (LifeSiteNews) – LifeSiteNews’ publication of a news story detailing Pope Francis’ statements on the plane returning from Africa on November 30 has caused much reaction. I will admit it’s hard to believe the pope actually said what he did. I had the same reaction when I saw his comments to the Lutheran Church in Rome about communion. I would have found it hard to believe if I couldn’t watch the video myself.

Some reaction to our coverage suggested that we used faulty translation and did not put the Pope’s words into context. Therefore we’ve put together the video of the Pope’s remarks on the plane about condoms with the official Vatican English translations (Vatican Information Service) at the bottom of the video. In those instances where the Vatican omitted translation we’ve supplied the missing words.

Therefore you can see for yourself what the pope said, in the context given by the Vatican. We stand by our earlier coverage.

STORY: Pope Francis attacks ‘fundamentalist’ Catholics, dismisses condom ban as unimportant

The Vatican’s own rendition says, “A South African correspondent commented on the devastation caused by AIDS in Africa, where the epidemic continues, and where prevention is still the key. He asked the Pope whether or not it was time to change the Church's position on the use of condoms.”

Here is the full text of the Pope’s response as rendered by the Vatican Information Service:

The question seems to me to be too narrow, or rather a partial question. Yes, it is one of the methods; the morality of the Church finds itself before a perplexity: it is the fifth or the sixth commandment, defending life, or that the sexual relationship must be open to life? … This questions makes me think about what they did to Jesus once. 'Tell me Master, is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?'. It is obligatory to heal! … But malnutrition, the exploitation of people, slave labour, the lack of drinking water: these are the problems. Let us not ask if we can use this sticking plaster or another for a small wound. The great wound is social injustice, the injustice of the environment, the injustice that I have mentioned such as exploitation and malnutrition. … I do not like to make reference to such specific cases when people die for lack of water or hunger, because of their habitat. … When everyone has been healed, when there are no longer these tragic diseases caused by mankind, either by social injustice or to earn more money. … Then we can ask the question, 'is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?'. Why do they continue the production and trafficking of weapons? Wars are the greatest cause of mortality. … I would say, do not think about whether or not it is lawful to heal on the Sabbath. I would like to say to humanity: ensure justice, and when everyone is healed, when there is no more injustice in this world, we can talk about the Sabbath.

Please see the video for the full remarks:



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VIDEO: Pope says ‘fundamentalist’ Catholics do ‘great harm’ which ‘must be combated’

John-Henry Westen John-Henry Westen Follow John-Henry

December 2, 2015 (LifeSiteNews) -- LifeSiteNews’ publication of a news story detailing the Pope Francis’ statements on the plane returning from Africa on November 30 has caused much reaction. I will admit it’s hard to believe the pope actually said what he did. I had the same reaction when I saw his comments to the Lutheran Church in Rome about Communion. I would have found it hard to believe if I couldn’t watch the video myself.

Some reaction to our coverage suggested that we used faulty translation and did not put the pope’s words into context. Therefore we’ve put together the video of the pope’s remarks on the plane about fundamentalist Catholics with the official Vatican English translations (Vatican Information Service) at the bottom of the video. In those instances where the Vatican omitted translation we’ve supplied the missing words.

Therefore you can see for yourself what the pope said, in the context given by the Vatican. We stand by our earlier coverage.

The Vatican’s own rendition says, “A French journalist asked whether, faced with the danger of fundamentalism, religious leaders should intervene in the political arena.”  As part of his response, according to the Vatican, the pope said, “Fundamentalism is a sickness that we find in all religions.” He added, “Among Catholics there are many, not a few, many, who believe to hold the absolute truth and they go ahead by harming others with slander and defamation, and they do great harm…  And it must be combated.”

Please see the video for the full remarks:



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