Kirsten Andersen

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Judge rules against activist who called NAACP ‘National Association for Abortion of Colored People’

Kirsten Andersen

Meet Ryan Bomberger.  He’s a pro-life activist who was conceived in rape, adopted by loving parents, and is now an adoptive parent himself.  He currently runs the pro-life Radiance Foundation.

He also happens to be black.

Why is that relevant?  Well, Bomberger’s race is relevant because last year, he dared to take on the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, a.k.a. the NAACP, when he posted several articles on his website criticizing the group’s pro-abortion stance and support for Planned Parenthood, and joked that it should actually be called “The National Association for the Abortion of Colored People.” 

Now, if anyone has license to criticize the NAACP, it’s a black man who is upset with what he sees as the group’s refusal to condemn the ongoing genocide taking place in millions of black women’s wombs via the abortion trade, which targets minority neighborhoods. 

But did the NAACP see it that way? 

Of course not. 

The group sent Bomberger a cease-and-desist letter and later sued him, accusing him of trademark infringement and misleading the public. They argued that linking the NAACP acronym to abortion would “tarnish” the group’s reputation.  The NAACP claimed it does not support abortion, "but rather supports a woman's right to choose."

Bomberger counter-sued, arguing that his organization’s use of the acronym fell under fair use law as a parody, as it was obviously meant to mock the 105-year-old group and not rebrand them.  But the NAACP claimed that in a survey they took, ten percent of respondents thought their initials stood for something having to do with abortion.

Late last month, U.S. District Judge Raymond Jackson sided with the NAACP.  He ordered Bomberger to stop the parodies and forced Radiance to pay unspecified court costs.

"Radiance is not prevented from criticizing the NAACP's positions or activities, but may not present such critiques in a manner that is likely to confuse the public," Judge Jackson wrote.

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In a statement, Bomberger slammed the ruling as a "frightening assault on our First Amendment rights."

"Judge Jackson's decision denies the right to openly criticize or satirize an organization's documented actions in news commentary," he said.  Still, he has removed all mention of the NAACP from his organization’s websites.

So here’s the question: If being connected to abortion is so harmful to the NAACP’s image, why do they continue to promote “a woman’s right to choose?” Why do they stay partnered with abortion giant Planned Parenthood, the eugenic roots of which are as racist as they come?

Even putting history aside, Planned Parenthood is still one of the most racist organizations in existence today.  Recent studies have shown that 79 percent of all Planned Parenthood abortion facilities are located in predominantly black or Hispanic neighborhoods.  While blacks make up only 11 percent of the population, they account for 30 percent of all abortions.  And an undercover investigation by pro-life activist Lila Rose exposed Planned Parenthood employees accepting donations specifically for the purpose of aborting black babies.

Given all that, you would think the NAACP would be eager to cut ties with Planned Parenthood and join up with the Radiance Foundation – an organization founded by a black man and which encourages adoption and involved fatherhood – two solid solutions to some of the most difficult problems facing black Americans today.

Unfortunately, you’d be wrong.

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