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Message to Catholic bishops: How NOT to do damage control

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Cardinal Wuerl needs to resign. Sign the petition here.

August 7, 2018 (LifeSiteNews) – Since the Catholic clergy sexual abuse scandals first broke in US secular media in 2002, LifeSite has published hundreds of reports related to the scandals. From the very beginning we warned that the sex abuse crisis much more about homosexuality among the clergy than about pedophilia, a conclusion that the US bishops consistently avoided admitting. Over and over again we wrote that, despite the many measures implemented by the US bishops following the revelations of the scandals, there was one issue that was still not being addressed - the prevalence of active homosexuals among the clergy and the need to remove all such homosexuals from clerical roles at all levels. 

Anyway, here we are again, inevitably because the bishops have still refused to publicly address the problem. Secular media have again blown the whistle that there have been credible accusations that a cardinal of the Church has been involved in homosexual advances on seminarians and even an 11-year old boy. 

So, how are Church authorities responding to this latest storm of credible accusations? Generally, with the exception of some strong initial actions, the same as always - dishonesty, covering up, ineffective proposals, etc. 

Then yesterday I came across this list from Politickles that seemed to exactly sum up what the bishops have been doing for decades in response to the rot that keeps being exposed. 

Enjoy. There is sadly a lot of truth to this as our experiences over the past 16 years and more have proven.

How Not to Do DAMAGE CONTROL

The first rule of damage control is to anticipate things that can go wrong and make sure they don’t.  Amazingly enough, most people don’t get this simple rule and respond in the worst possible way. If you want to be just as stupid, here are a few tips for compounding the problem you could have avoided.

  • Worm your way into a position for which you’re unqualified.

  • Create a culture of incompetence and dishonesty.

  • When a problem arises, ignore it.

  • When others bring the problem to your attention, deny it.

  • When it becomes impossible to deny, insist that the whole thing is being blown out of proportion.

  • When it becomes clear that the problem is truly serious, declare that you are preoccupied with much more important matters from which you cannot be distracted.

  • When it is suggested that the problem may be more important than those other matters, malign the people who drew attention to the problem.

  • When that doesn’t work, pretend that you knew nothing about the problem and blame it on someone else.

  • When that person is exonerated and the cloud of suspicion settles over your head, announce that you will launch an investigation to find out how the problem arose and who the culprits are.

  • Appoint the culprits to the investigative committee (happens all the time).

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Steve Jalsevac

Steve is the co-founder and managing director of LifeSiteNews.com.