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SAVANNAH, Georgia, October 25, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) – The funeral Mass for Charles Frederick “Andy” Anderson, who legally changed his first name to “Prolife” in 1987, was held at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Savannah on Monday, October 24th.

For almost twenty years Prolife Anderson witnessed to life in his adopted town of Reno in such original ways that he became one of Reno’s most recognizable figures.

From the late 1970s to the late 1990s, according to the Reno Gazette-Journal, Anderson was known for driving around Reno in a vehicle covered with pro-life placards, a baby carriage on the top and enlarged photos of aborted children.

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Anderson returned to Savannah, his boyhood hometown, in 1997 due to failing health.

“Andy was a long time fighter for life in the Reno area, before moving to Georgia,” said Reno resident and pro-life activist Timothy Bauer.

“The first time I met Andy, he was outside an abortion mill, kneeling on his car praying,” Bauer told LifeSiteNews. “I had the opportunity when Andy was in town to pray outside the clinic with him, join with Prolife in pro-life marches. He was gung-ho for saving the lives of the innocent.”

In a 1991 interview with the Reno Gazette-Journal, Anderson related that soon after moving to Reno in 1969 following twenty years in the US Air Force, his step-son asked him for money for an abortion for his pregnant girlfriend. He became a pro-life activist as a result.

Describing himself as “a human pro-life poster in God’s hands,” Anderson explained that “If they can have neon signs in front of those dirty book stores in Reno . . . why can’t we have neon signs for what is right? That’s why I made myself as obvious as possible.”

Pat Glenn, former president of Nevada Right-to-Life said Anderson’s unusual methods of proclaiming the pro-life message were founded in a sincere dedication to the culture of life.

“He kept the abortion issue in front of people … I think he did a real service in that area,” Glenn said. “He was kind of a lone ranger. He was rather flamboyant. Some people thought he was a little too flamboyant. His heart was very dedicated to this issue. I thought everything he did was very sincere.”

Among the ways Anderson used to protest abortion, according to media reports, was to crawl from Reno town centre to an abortion clinic while carrying a cross, praying aloud, and offering his message of life to passersby.

It was reported that his car displaying pro-life signs and the baby carriage was set on fire twice, and that Anderson was arrested for his witness to life at least ten times.

Janine Hansen of Nevada Eagle Forum told the Reno Gazette-Journal, “Andy was a person of true commitment.”

“He didn’t really care what kind of criticism he might receive. He was willing under any circumstances to stand up for the unborn,” Hansen said.

Prolife Anderson has requested that donations for the cause of life be sent to Priests for Life, P.O. Box 141172, Staten Island, NY 10314.

Donations for Priests for Life will also be received at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church, 1003 East Victory Dr., Savannah, GA, 31405 and at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist, 222 East Harris St., Savannah, GA, 31401.

Timothy Bauer summed up the heroic achievement of Prolife Anderson: “If we had more persons like Andy in the US, abortion could be overcome. Andy tried … “

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