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(LifeSiteNews) — Dilay Willemstein, who was to represent the Netherlands at the Miss World competition in Puerto Rico in December, made the personal choice not to participate because she says she is “not ready” to get the COVID experimental vaccine.  

Her story went viral in the Dutch and Turkish media – her father is Dutch and her mother is from Turkey – after she posted a short message on Instagram saying she was letting the runner-up go in her place. 

“I’m open to answering all questions,” she said. 

Willemstein, 21, who won the title of Miss Netherlands at the beginning of July, would have fulfilled a longtime dream of competing in the Miss World pageant. 

Commenting on Willemstein’s decision, Miss Netherlands CEO Katja Maes said organizers did not know beforehand whether vaccine status would be a problem and they had not asked about vaccinations because they did not want to request medical information. 

Traveling to Puerto Rico does not require a “vaccine.” The unvaccinated must have a negative COVID test less than three days old and are obliged to self-isolate for seven days on the island and show proof of a follow-up negative test. However, for large events such as the Miss World election, “full vaccination” is being asked of all participants because if non-vaccinated individuals were to join, the venue would only be allowed half of its nominal capacity. 

In several interviews regarding her decision, including one by AD Nederland, she stated, “At this point I’m not ready yet to take the vaccine, and I have no choice. If I don’t take the vaccine, this means I’m not allowed to go, and that really helped my choice because really, I’m not ready for it and for me this means I’m not allowed to join the Miss World election even though I’m the finalist. For me this is really the biggest reason that I’m not going any longer.” 

She added, “If I did do it, I’d go against my own principles and that’s something I’ve never done and I won’t do it now.” 

While Willemstein did not explain why she does not want to take the experimental jab, she gave very strong witness to the fact that she is prepared to lose the chance to enhance her a career as an international beauty queen rather than get a “vaccine.” 

She also willingly handed over her Miss Netherlands title to runner-up Lizzy Dobbe. Asked about this, Willemstein replied, “Well, in principle, it’s a choice I just made myself to hand over my title, and so she has a right to it.” 

Dobbe reacted with “surprise and joy” but refused to tell the media whether she was vaccinated, saying this is “medical information” covered by medical confidentiality. “I stand with everyone, the vaccinated and the unvaccinated,” she added. 

Maes said she found Willemstein’s decision to make her choice public on Instagram “not very polite,” although “we still love her and are proud of her.” But she did not comment on the injustice of a situation where an experimental “vaccine” has become required for public events. 

In the interview with AD Nederland, Willemstein acknowledged that she did not show much anger or disappointment. 

“Of course, I’ve given a lot of thought to this choice, it’s not that I knew what I was going to do in just one day. I kept putting it off, and now I’ve made it public it really feels like a relief, because people were asking me about it. I really didn’t know what to do. Now it’s truly a relief for me that everything is out in the open.” 

Comments on Willemstein’s Instagram post were mostly supportive and demonstrated “respect” for her choice. Willemstein’s willingness to give up her title to remain faithful to her personal choices likely influenced the positive response, but is quite surprising in the Dutch context. Almost 75 percent of the population has received one jab (66.6 percent are fully vaccinated to date), and although an active minority is fighting the experimental shot and a recently introduced sanitary passport that is one step away from mandatory vaccination, social control is exceptionally stringent. Questioning the official government narrative on the virus and COVID jabs means being criticized, and most people refuse to discuss any rational arguments against restrictive measures and “vaccination.” 

The official COVID death toll in the Netherlands has been near nil since June, with an average of 6 daily deaths at most since June 11. Less than 310 people are currently hospitalized in the Netherlands with a positive COVID test out of a population of more than 17 million. 

Adverse effects statistics no longer include information about deaths after the jab. The last public update was published in July and included data up to April 15, 2021. At that point, 257 deaths had been registered in the Netherlands after 3.5 million shots. 

While Willemstein made headlines because of her refusal to comply with the “vaccine” madness, other reports on social media paint an ugly picture of Dutch social life under the sanitary pass law that requires people to have the “vaccine” or prove COVID negative status to eat inside restaurants and join other collective activities. 

One woman, Karin Maria Keser, tearfully told of her experience on YouTube on October 1. She went to a sauna – where access is unregulated – was given a different-colored wristband to show her unvaccinated COVID status. After enjoying her bath, she hoped to eat at the facility’s restaurant on its heated terrace. Because she lacked the sanitary pass, she was sent to an unheated part of the terrace and served food that soon turned cold because of the chilly outdoor temperature. 

“I felt like a dog, like someone who is not allowed to be part of normal society,” she said on her video. “One man moved away from me saying he was worried and didn’t feel safe.” She observed that she had been in closed, warm rooms with all of the other guests without needing to show a pass and had actually sat next to the same gentleman without causing any concern. Complaining about the complete incoherence of the measures set up to “fight the virus,” she asked, “Is this the Netherlands? Is this our tolerant country?” 

She left the restaurant without eating her meal. “I thought, I’m not doing this anymore, I’m not joining this. How have we fallen so low?” she said. 

 

The following is a transcript of the interview with Ad Nederland: 

The Dutch Miss World contestant has retired from the competition. At this moment in time she does not yet want to get the vaccine, which is required to join the beauty contest in Puerto Rico. Miss World Netherlands, Dilay Willemstein, good afternoon. Why did you make this choice? 

At this point I’m not ready yet to take the vaccine, and I have no choice. If I don’t take the vaccine, this means I’m not allowed to go, and that really helped my choice because really, I’m not ready for it and for me this means I’m not allowed to join the Miss World election even though I’m the finalist. For me this is really the biggest reason that I’m not going any more. 

But this was truly your moment. You were Miss Netherlands, you might have become Miss World. Is it really worth it? 

Yes. I listened to my feelings. Apparently this was just not my path. If I did do it I’d go against my own principles and that’s something I’ve never done and I won’t do it now. 

What kind of reactions are you getting? 

Well, the reactions are quite positive, I must say. Many people say they have respect for me but of course there are also negative reactions, but that’s something you can’t avoid. 

Are you keeping the Miss Netherlands title? Or must you give it up too?  

No, I’ll hand over my title too. 

So there’s a runner-up, she’s called Lizzy Dobbe, and she’ll take your place. What do you think of that? 

Well, in principle it’s a choice I just made myself to hand over my title, and so she has a right to it. 

I can’t detect a lot of anger or disappointment. Is that right? Is it just the way it is? 

Of course, I’ve given a lot of thought to this choice, it’s not that I knew what I was going to do in just one day. I kept putting it off, and now I’ve made it public it really feels like a relief, because people were asking me about it. I really didn’t know what to do. Now it’s truly a relief for me that everything is out in the open. 

 

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