Kirsten Andersen

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Former homosexual, fed up with threats of violence, launches ten-day road trip to Washington, D.C.

Kirsten Andersen
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DALLAS, TX, July 22, 2013 (LifeSiteNews) – Douglas McIntyre is “mad as hell” and he’s “not going to take it anymore.”

So begins the announcement for McIntyre’s ten-day, ten-city road trip from Dallas to Washington, D.C., where the former homosexual, now a husband and father of three, will lobby Congress to demand tolerance and protection from what he describes as a campaign of “threats and harassment that [are] being waged against former homosexuals.”  On the way there, he will make stops in Dallas, Little Rock, Memphis, Nashville, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh and Richmond to rally with supporters and “draw attention to the homo-fascism in this country – the bullying from gay activists who say only one viewpoint on homosexuality can be tolerated.”

McIntyre was moved to action by the recent postponing of the kickoff event for the first-ever Ex-Gay Pride Month, which had been scheduled for July 31 at the Family Research Center in Washington, D.C..  The event was rescheduled for September and moved to an undisclosed location after threats of protests and violence caused organizers to worry for the safety of their guests and speakers.

"When we announced that this event was going to happen at FRC about two weeks ago, we received – as did FRC – a lot of attention, which was good, but we also received a lot of negative attention," event sponsor Christopher Doyle, of Voice of the Voiceless (VoV) told the Christian Post.

“[T]here started to be a lot of online chatter about trying to disrupt this event," he said, "trying to demonstrate against it, trying to protest it. Basically, after experiencing all of that hate and harassment toward us online and also directed at FRC, we just started to take a second look at this event."

Doyle said that the choice of FRC headquarters for a venue angered homosexual activists, who classify the organization as a “hate group” for its support of traditional marriage.  In 2012, at the height of the Chick-fil-A controversy, the site was the target of a terrorist attack in which a homosexual activist walked into the building, said “I don’t like your politics,” and opened fire on a security guard.  Despite being shot in the arm, the guard managed to wrestle the gun away before anyone else was hurt.  The shooter was later found to be carrying 15 Chick-fil-A sandwiches along with ammunition in his backpack.

In a videotaped confession, the 28-year-old homosexual activist said he intended to “kill as many as possible and smear the Chick-fil-A sandwiches in victims’ faces, and kill the guard.” He hoped the atrocity would “make a statement against the people who work in that building...and with their stance against gay rights and [for] Chick-fil-A.”

McIntyre, who co-founded Homosexuals Anonymous, which he describes as the oldest and longest-running organization in the world helping individuals with unwanted same-sex attraction leave homosexuality, said the ongoing campaign of intimidation by homosexuals against those who have chosen to leave the lifestyle must stop.

“How dare they try to disrupt our event on July 31, intimidate, and threaten us,” said McIntyre. “I'm not going to take it anymore.”

Added McIntyre, “For too long gay activists have silenced us, marginalized our voices, and cut us out of the conversation. While they preach tolerance for gays, they routinely practice discrimination towards former homosexuals like myself who have taken a different path.”

McIntyre is calling his road trip “Grandpa Goes to Washington,” as he is now a grandfather of four.  He says that part of the purpose of his trip is to advocate for the next generation of young people, whom he worries are being brainwashed by a culture that glorifies disordered sexuality.   

“This nonsense has got to stop!” said McIntyre.  He pointed to a children’s show called “SheZow” as a prime example of activist television aimed at the very young.  The cartoon features a little boy with a secret ring that transforms him into a female superhero called SheZow.  The show is played for laughs, but McIntyre says it’s just another way of normalizing abnormal sexuality. 

Shows like “SheZow,” said McIntyre, teach kids that “being Transgender is cool, but counseling to overcome same-sex attractions and/or changing sexual orientations is harmful.”  He says that when he reaches Washington, he will lobby Congress for “media oversight and accountability” to protect children from gender-bending programming like “SheZow” that “violates their innocence.”

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McIntyre will also lobby for freedom of choice for adolescents struggling with same-sex attraction to seek treatment and counseling – including reparative therapy, which some states have moved toward banning under pressure from homosexual activists. 

McIntyre would also like to see ex-gays protected under federal hate crimes laws.

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