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Trudeau to issue new coin commemorating decriminalizaton of gay sex

Dorothy Cummings McLean Dorothy Cummings McLean Follow Dorothy

OTTAWA, January 4, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) – Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau has granted the Royal Mint permission to release a new one-dollar coin designed to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his father’s decriminalization of homosexuality. 

Trudeau’s government approved the coin design on December 14, reported CBC last month. 

According to CBC, the design is a "… stylized rendering of two overlapping human faces within a large circle, the left half of the left face in front view and the right face in profile facing left, the two faces forming one whole face in front view composed of two eyes with eyebrows, a nose, a mouth and two ears with a small hoop earring on the left ear …" It is understood that the two human faces belong to a couple of the same sex. 

The coin will also feature the years “1969”, when private homosexual acts were decriminalized, and 2019. The word “equality” in both English and French will be included, as will the initials of the artist, currently known only as “RA”.

“Canada’s new coin celebrates day gay sex was legalized,” states a Dec. 30th headline from Queerty.com. 

The one-dollar coin, or “loonie”, as it is popularly known in Canada, was originally, and is normally, engraved with the head of the monarch and the image of a common loon (Gavia immer) on the reverse. A number of commemorative loonies have been struck since the coin was introduced in 1987, usually to celebrate sporting events, like the Olympics or the centenaries of such cultural icons as the Montreal Canadiens hockey team, the Navy, and women’s right to vote. 

It is unprecedented to mint a loonie to mark the semi-centennial of anything, let alone a change in the Criminal Code.    

In 1967 Justin Trudeau’s father, Pierre Trudeau (1919-2000), acting as Canada’s Justice Minister, introduced a controversial “Omnibus Bill” (Bill C-195) to the House of Commons, asking for sweeping changes to the nation’s Criminal Code. Among the changes were the partial-decriminalization of abortion, new restrictions on gun ownership, and the decriminalization of certain sex acts if performed in private.  

Borrowing the famous phrase from a Globe and Mail reporter, Pierre Trudeau told reporters that there was “no place for the state in the bedrooms of the nation.” The elder Trudeau also suggested that homosexual acts in public were “a different matter.” 

As a matter of fact, the original Omnibus Bill did not seek to decriminalize homosexuality per se, but to distinguish between public and private sexual acts. It stated only that certain sexual acts between consenting adults aged 21 or older were legal when performed in private. If a third person or others were present, these acts--including sodomy--were still considered illegal.

This detail of the Bill changed, however. In 1968, the Omnibus Bill was modified and reintroduced to Parliament by the now-Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s Justice Minister, John Turner, as Bill C-150. Inspired by similar legislation pertaining to England and Wales, the Bill now included the explicit decriminalization of homosexual acts among those aged 21 and over. On May 14, 1969, after three weeks of furious opposition from the Quebec’s Catholic Créditiste (Social Credit) party,  Bill C-150 passed third reading in the House of Commons by a vote of 149:55. There were 59 abstentions. 

When Bill C-150 was signed into law both homosexual acts and abortion became legal in Canada under certain circumstances. However, men in Canada continued to be arrested for soliciting or performing sexual acts in public and semi-public places. In 1981, Toronto police conducted a series of raids on bathhouses, charging men they found there with prostitution and indecency. These and other raids led to accusations of discrimination against homosexuals, and Toronto police have since apologized. 

Canada legalized same-sex "marriage" in 2005, thirty-six years after the passage of bill C-150. Today, public institutions across the country, including courts, schools, and various government organizations, are unrelenting in pushing what critics say is a homosexual agenda on the population. 

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