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Marie Stopes headquarters in central London
Fr. Mark Hodges Fr. Mark Hodges

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Marie Stopes cleared to restart abortions just weeks after shutdown over safety concerns

Fr. Mark Hodges Fr. Mark Hodges

LONDON, England, October 12, 2016 (LifeSiteNews) — Marie Stopes International (MSI) is resuming abortions throughout the United Kingdom just seven weeks after surprise inspections forced a shutdown because of serious violations that put women's health in danger.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) found that staff might not have had the competence, training, or certification to administer sedation and anesthesia. Government officials also found “immediate concerns about issues of consent.”

MSI suspended abortions for minors, abortions requiring sedation, and all surgical abortions at its Norwich business. England's National Health Service helped the abortion industry by assisting 250 women every week to find alternative abortionists.

Now, the CQC says it is "satisfied" with the worldwide abortion giant's reforms, but critics remain unsatisfied. 

Britain’s Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (SPUC) said the CQC's response was “inadequate” and “immoral.” The SPUC levied a charge of government corruption against the CQC, accusing it of “unlawful collusion in criminal activity.”

The "collusion" charge stems from British law only allowing abortion when the mother's health is in danger. SPUC says that in practice this law is routinely skirted illegally, with 98 percent of UK abortions granted “on mental grounds when there is no real risk” to the mother’s mental or physical health.

SPUC General Secretary Paul Tully pointed out the dangers of abortion, even when inspections find nothing wrong, noting three women who died from negligence after MSI abortions, including Aisha Chithira, Jade Rees, and 15-year-old Alesha Thomas.

Critics also expressed concern for the millions of women around the world going to MSI abortion centers where there are no inspections or any regulatory oversight.

MSI receives millions in tax dollars and performs 70,000 abortions per year in the UK alone.

Pro-life organizations in the United States also criticize Britain’s handling of women's safety concerns. "Abortion complications and horrendous conditions as detailed at Marie Stopes are not confined to England abortion clinics," Operation Rescue President Troy Newman told LifeSiteNews. "We see these kinds of things all over the United States."

"Marie Stopes International is just a microcosm of the dangers that exist at abortion clinics throughout the world," Newman continued. "Abortion is never safe for the baby, and often fatal for the mother. It’s high time to end the barbaric practice of killing children."

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Genevieve Edwards, policy director for Marie Stopes, told the Nursing Times that the abortion giant expects to be "fully operational again" offering "termination services" by the end of this month.

The SPUC contested the decision to allow MSI to resume aborting babies when the CQC's report on their inspections hasn't even been released yet.

"These serious concerns about MSI have clearly not been allowed to make a significant difference to the government-funded abortion program," Tully charged. "It seems likely that more examples of malpractice will come to light when the official report is published."

A government spokesman told the BBC, "CQC has a duty to ensure that its information and judgments about providers are accurate. The inspection reports are still undergoing their checks to guarantee this. Detailed reports will be published in due course and will be made available on our website."

Founded in 1976 and now with more than nine thousand employees on its payroll, Marie Stopes International is an NGO (non-governmental organization) abortion business operating in 38 countries around the world.

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