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CALGARY, May 31, 2004 (LifeSiteNews.com) – University of Calgary professor and   Alberta’s Senator-Elect, Ted Morton, has accused the federal government and courts of engineering a three-part, Machiavellian pre-election scheme to prevent gay ‘marriage’ legal recognition from being addressed during the election.  Morton wrote in his May 22 Calagary Herald article that:  1. the government’s recent Supreme Court reference on same-sex marriage 2. the ramming through the Senate of Svend Robinson’s Bill C-250   3. the delay of the election call long enough to allow the Supreme Court to rule to uphold the Liberals’ gag law – all conspired to delay final decisions and shut down public debate on the court-ordered, radical social change measure during the 36 day election period.  Morton reported that “the chilling effect on policy debate is already evident” since Focus on the Family has cancelled its planned media campaign promoting traditional marriage for fear of prosecution. “If this is a preview of Canadian democracy in the 21st century, God help us!”, Morton added.  In response to these developments, the often outspoken Albetan suggests that provincial governments, and specifically Alberta, could act to protect Canadian democracy by requesting a temporary injunction against the enforcement of C-250 for the duration of the election.

Morton emphasizes, “If the Supreme Court won’t defend Charter freedoms against Liberal manipulation, then the provinces should”.  See also   US Senate to Consider Hate-Crimes Amendment https://www.family.org/cforum/feature/a0032255.cfm and   US ‘Hate crimes’ bill: Prescription for tyranny https://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=38708

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