Hilary White, Rome Correspondent

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Risk of death increases after abortion: Danish study

Hilary White, Rome Correspondent
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ROME, September 6, 2012, (LifeSiteNews.com) – While the abortion industry continues to say that abortion is safer than natural childbirth, more research is finding that abortion significantly increases the risk of maternal death. A new study of 463,473 women from Denmark over a 30-year period shows that the risk of death following a first trimester abortion is significantly increased compared to women delivering a first pregnancy. The heightened risk ranges from 84 percent after 180 days to 39 percent after 10 years.

The risk is considerably higher for abortions after 12 weeks gestation, from 331 percent after one year to 141 percent after a decade.

Death rates associated with natural childbirth were lower than those associated with all three types of pregnancy loss in every year. The study showed a significantly higher rate of death associated with later abortions than for natural birth for every time period over one year.

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The rate of death compared with miscarriage was not higher than that for birth, except in the 10-year range.

The research was conducted by David C. Reardon and Priscilla K. Coleman of the Elliot Institute and the Human Development and Family Studies department of Bowling Green State University in Ohio.

The academics looked at medical and death records for the entire female population of Denmark born between 1962 and 1991 and who were alive in 1980. They did not consider specific causes of death. The authors wrote that they were particularly interested in seeing the rates of death associated with early abortions, for which there is very little solid data.

They said that previous population studies on the long term effects of abortion have failed to take into account “complete reproductive histories” of their subjects. Reardon and Coleman’s research corrected this by eliminating multiple births, examining only first pregnancy rates of singleton pregnancies. It examined death rate outcomes per 100,000 population after both early and late abortions, those after 12 weeks gestation.

Their numbers comes from Statistics Denmark: the National Hospital Register, the Fertility database for births and stillbirths, the National Board of Health Abortion Registry for abortions and the Cause of Death Register for 1977 to 2004.

The study closely follows recently released data from Finland, published in the journal Human Reproduction, showing statistically significant links between abortion and low birth weight and prematurity in subsequent births.

 

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