Matthew Hoffman

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Spanish court rejects evidence, acquits Spain’s 'abortion mogul' on late-term abortion law

Matthew Hoffman
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MADRID, February 1, 2013, (LifeSiteNews.com) - Spanish abortionist Carlos Morin, who is known as Spain's 'abortion mogul' for the scale of his enterprise and his willingness to kill unborn children at later stages of pregnancy, was absolved yesterday of violating the country's abortion law after the court rejected hidden camera video evidence that reporters took of his clinics' activities.

Morin and 10 others were accused of numerous counts of using faked diagnoses of danger for the "psychological health" of pregnant women, which were required to shield abortionists from prosecution prior to changes in the law in 2009. They were also accused of performing abortions beyond the decriminalized limit of 22 months of pregnancy.

The evidence consisted of video shot surrepitiously by Danish reporters documenting Morin's activities, which involved women coming from Denmark and other countries to escape domestic laws protecting children from abortion at later stages of pregnancy.

Attorneys also presented numerous documents that contained faked signatures of physicians, as well as evidence that psychological test answers were filled out by staff rather than by patients, according to expert witnesses.

However, the three-judge panel also rejected the physical documentation of abuse of psychological diagnoses, going so far as to excuse the faking of signatures.

"Some of the clinic workers that have testified as witnesses have justified their use of the identity of professionals that had not intervened in concrete medical acts, both in operating room records and in reports and clinic and anesthesia forms, because they wished to avoid administrative penalties in case the lack of forms were discovered by auditors, and therefore [they acted] for the benefit of the business itself and never with the intention of harming the women who decide to interrupt their pregnancy, or anyone else," the judges wrote.

The judges also claimed that "every undesired pregnancy implies in and of itself an evident risk for the psychological health of the mother."

"In the clinics that were investigated there was verification of certain administrative irregularities, but no indication that they were practicing illegal abortions," the judges wrote.

The clinics, they added, were run "with less rigor than what was desirable."

The court also discarded evidence that Morin and his associates were destroying the bodies of their victims with industrial strength meat grinders, claiming that the prosecution was "obsessive" about the matter and that it is "evident" that abortion clinics "have systems for disposing of biological remains."

Morin, however, claimed to the court that the meat grinders in his clinic were for the disposal of chickens and piglets that he had used in teaching veterinarian interns at a local hospital.

The pro-life activist group E-Cristians, which helped to bring the charges against Morin, has expressed its outrage at the ruling and says that it will appeal the decision to Spain's Supreme Tribunal, and even to the European Tribunal of Justice.

According to the group, the "the court has issued an ideological sentence, in which the prefrences and social views of the judges are presented, but not the facts and their interrelationships, which constiute the basis of all judicial practice."

"It is incredible that, following the evidence presented by the prosecutor and the known facts, that they did not conclude the existence of any form of penal culpability," said E-Cristians president Josep Miro i Ardevol. 

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