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Nobody has more in common with white supremacists than the abortion industry

Jonathon van Maren Jonathon van Maren Follow Jonathon

August 18, 2017 (LifeSiteNews) — The disturbing images of alt-right marchers bellowing their anti-Semitism into the night by the glow of their hoisted torches coming out of Charlottesville this weekend followed by a young neo-Nazi smashing his car into a crowd of protestors has officially catapulted the alt-right from relative online obscurity to nonstop national attention. It is no longer possible for those who thought the alt-right were merry pranksters or mischievous meme warriors to continue insisting that the alt-right are harmless: their Nazi flags, Sieg Heil salutes, and anti-Semitic threats have now been beamed around the world. Condemnation is the only rational — and decent — response.

I’ve been writing about the alt-right for over a year now, first detailing their anti-Semitism and later examining their pro-choice position on abortion. Alt-right thinkers have reached a near-consensus on the issue: They approve of abortion in some situations, and dislike it in others. Specifically, as Alymer Fisher laid out in his essay “The Pro-Life Temptation,” the alt-right does not believe in the concept of human rights because they deny that people have inherent value, but instead derive their value from membership in a certain tribe. The alt-right also despises interracial adoption—those adoptive parents would qualify as “race traitors” — and is quite pleased with the sky-high abortion rate in the African American community.

Richard Spencer, the neo-Nazi who actually coined the term “alt-right” and runs the website AltRight.com (which I’m pleased to say has published a denunciation of me), took Fisher’s views even further in his own rant on abortion. He affirmed the fact that the alt-right does not believe in human rights, and then approvingly explained the eugenic effect of legal abortion in reducing the African American population. Smart white people used abortion for the right reasons, as well—Spencer noted approvingly that abortion could be used to dispense with pre-born children diagnosed with Down syndrome. Spencer then cited his inspiration as Lothrop Stoddard, a long-dead Klansman who thought that African Americans posed a threat to “white civilization” and wrote a white supremacist tome called The Rising Tide of Color.

Lothrop Stoddard, an American so beloved by the Nazis for his racial theories that he even met personally with Adolf Hitler, has a connection with today’s abortion industry — most notably Planned Parenthood, the abortion giant that is currently joining the clamoring condemnations of the alt-right. In fact, he worked closely with Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, being appointed by her to the board of the Birth Control League. The Birth Control League was the forerunner to Planned Parenthood—and one of the reasons that the BCL needed a name change in the first place was because the connections to the Nazis were in many cases too overt to be ignored.

If Margaret Sanger were alive today, there is no doubt that she would be a leading figure on the alt-right — her views on eugenics and race are nearly identical. Discussing her 1939 “Negro Project,” Sanger noted that, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten out the idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” In March of the same year, she wrote in a letter that “a drastic curtailment of the birth rate at the source of the unfit, the diseased and the incompetent” was necessary, and to accomplish this “the birth control clinics all over the country are doing their utmost to reach the lower strata [minorities] of our population.”

Sanger was even blunter in her book The Pivot of Civilization, where she advocated for the elimination of those she considered to be “human weeds,” stating that she was calling “for the cessation of charity, for the segregation of morons, misfits, and maladjusted,” and additionally, the sterilization of “genetically inferior races.” Charity organizations that sought to better the lives of these inferior humans were, in Sanger’s opinion, delaying the progress of the human race — progress that could only be white. Sanger and Stoddard left no one doubting what their position was.

It was this Margaret Sanger, a woman who would have fit right into the racist and anti-Semitic mob in Charlottesville last weekend, who is revered by Planned Parenthood, the abortion conglomerate that carries on her legacy. Each year, Planned Parenthood bestows the Margaret Sanger Award on those they feel have helped them further their goals — recent recipients include actress Jane Fonda, Democrat House Leader Nancy Pelosi, abortionist Willie Parker, and failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. It boggles the mind that an organization which annually celebrates an alt-right darling would have the gall to mix calls for anti-racism measures and condemnations of Margaret Sanger’s intellectual descendants in with their tweets pushing abortion as “healthcare.”

Planned Parenthood’s record hasn’t gotten much better, either — they often target heavily non-white areas for abortion clinics, and have been recorded indicating their willingness to accept donations earmarked for the aborting of “black babies.” The abortion industry is working hard to make all the alt-right’s dreams come true, and ensure that Margaret Sanger’s legacy lives on: Nearly 20 million African American babies have been aborted since Roe v. Wade, and 35.6 percent of abortions are performed on black women in the U.S. — even though they make up only 13 percent of the female population. The alt-right talks about reducing minority populations — Planned Parenthood is actually doing it.

Ryan Bomberger, who was adopted into a multiracial family and went on to found The Radiance Foundation, points out the hypocrisy in Planned Parenthood’s attempt to climb on the anti-racism bandwagon. “Planned Parenthood demanding an ‘end to white supremacy’ is like Penthouse calling for an end to pornography,” he told me. “Planned Parenthood's umbilical cord is still attached to the mother who birthed the nation's billion-dollar abortion chain. They daily celebrate Margaret Sanger, whose brand of racist eugenics (despite her duplicitous public denunciations of abortion) would transform Planned Parenthood into the leading killer of black lives. It's all so mind-numbingly insane that an organization that has never changed its racist DNA is trying to position itself as a champion of racial justice.”

It is a mark of the pro-life movement’s success that the abortion industry itself would much prefer to talk about other “progressive” issues that they feel are more popular than abortion. It would also be rather inconvenient for people to discover that the alt-right thugs in Charlottesville revere as a hero the former board member of the organization that would become Planned Parenthood, because he shared the values of the woman whom they still celebrate with an annual award. The progressive Left claims to want an honest discussion about America’s past. Well, I say we should have it then — and in the process, perhaps more people will find out that nobody has more in common with the alt-right in America than the abortion industry does.

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