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Tony Perkins Tony Perkins

Opinion

Breath of fresh air: Dunkin’ Donuts insists on staying out of politics

Tony Perkins Tony Perkins

May 23, 2019 (Family Research Council) — When shoppers are barraged with Converse's 11-year-old drag kid and Target is busy funneling money to an LGBT indoctrination factory, it's a relief to see that some companies refused to get caught up in radical politics. Over at Dunkin' Donuts, executives have decided to distinguish themselves another way: by staying neutral.

"We are not Starbucks," Dunkin' Brands Vice President Drayton Martin told a group over lunch at the International Trademark Association. "We aren't political." That'll come as a breath of fresh air to fans of the chain, who are sick and tired of being told that their conservative politics aren't welcome at a certain Seattle franchise. Of course, conservatives have known about Starbucks' ultra-liberal ties dating back to 2012, when then-CEO Howard Schultz told shareholders that redefining marriage really is "core to the Starbucks brand." The company went on to sign a string of legal briefs for LGBT causes, arguing at one point that customers who didn't like it could take their business elsewhere. Some did.

Others broke their Starbucks habit a few years ago when 2nd Vote released a list of more than three dozen companies who've been contributing to Planned Parenthood — either directly or through an employee matching gift program. After intense public pressure, some of the brands dropped their partnership: AT&T, Coca-Cola, Ford, Macy's, and Xerox. Starbucks, one of the most politically liberal companies on the market, refused.

"Great American brands distinguish themselves by creating exceptional products and putting customers first. Everything else is a distraction," expert Adam Johnson points out. Like us, he's watched the fall of household names like Kellogg'sNikeTargetGrubHubPenzey's SpicesLevi'sand others because they decided to focus on politics, not products. At a time when some CEOs seem more preoccupied with pushing their brand of morals than merchandise, we applaud companies like Dunkin' for making the choice to do business — not politics.

Published with permission from the Family Research Council.

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