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Planned Parenthood official resigns over racist statements

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By Jill Stanek
Melissa Flourney

Any distrust Women of Color felt toward Planned Parenthood was kept out of the public eye until July 28, when the abortion giant blew any remaining shreds of good will.

It was on that day a story Planned Parenthood shopped to the New York Times was published, within which Planned Parenthood failed to give WOC credit for the concept of “reproductive justice” and submitted names of only white female leaders of the abortion lobby to interview – seven to be exact – but no WOC.

Enter into the fracas Melissa Flourney, pictured right, Louisiana State Director for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast – until August 15, that is, when she was forced to resign.

PPGC already had problems fending off three Medicaid fraud lawsuits as well as pro-lifers battling its plan to open an abortion clinic in New Orleans, where the population is 67% minority.

So Flournoy threw gas over a few fires on August 13 when she attended a screening of We Always Resist: Trust Black Women and took over the discussion afterward, telling WOC they needed to drop what they were doing and get behind Planned Parenthood’s political agenda and also telling a black leader she needed to kick a black Democrat pro-life representative’s a*s.

Kris Ford of Women’s Health And Justice Initiative detailed Flourney’s ghastly behavior in an open letter to Flournoy and PPGC. The entire letter is well worth the read. Here are excerpts (bold emphases theirs):Planned Parenthood official disses women of color on abortion, pro-choice

You felt that last night’s discussions should have centered on how organizations like Women With A Vision, the communities they serve, and women of color as a whole could “show up” for Planned Parenthood’s pro-choice fight….

The pro-choice/pro-life framework that Planned Parenthood supports and fuels largely leaves marginalized women behind. We gain nothing from joining your parade or lending our faces or our children’s faces to your billboards.

You, Melissa Flournoy, are a perfect example of the schism in work around reproductive rights. Your refusal to listen, your insistence on centering the conversation on your personal wants, and your flippant disregard for the work that organizations led by women of color have done. Worse, the huge organization that supports you is guilty of the same.

Part of why I’m wary of Planned Parenthood is that I lead an intersectional life by default…. You push us to the front of one charge after another so that you can wave your diversity banners. We fall first and are left bleeding every time….

Trust Black Women… [is] produced by Sister Song, the same organization whose member Monica Simpson wrote an open letter to Planned Parenthood on August 5th. Monica’s letter details the ways that Planned Parenthood consistently omits the intersectional work of grassroots organizations on reproductive issues….

Monica published her letter barely two weeks ago, and yet here I am publishing this one today because of your appalling behavior last night….

There was a feeling of reverence for the heaviness of the topics we’d discussed. Out of the three seconds of silence, your hand went up and the whole meeting went off the tracks. You started by introducing yourself as the Louisiana State director of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast. After that, you proceeded to ask Deon what she could “do about Katrina.” Though you didn’t pause to give context, you were talking about Katrina Jackson, the state representative out of Monroe, Louisiana who penned HB388. The bill effectively shuts down some of the abortion providers here in Louisiana. You complained about the representative’s unwillingness to hear your pleas, and jokingly said that you wanted to “put (Deon) into a ring and let you kick her ass!” Didn’t we JUST get done talking about how hurtful it is for black women to constantly be profiled as dangerous? Violent? Subhuman? How is this helpful? Deon had told us about the police reports she sees where police officers describe black women as primarily “big,” “black,” and “angry.” YOU TURNED AROUND AND DID THE SAME THING. Deon stated that she’s not going to go fight any other black women. She’s not doing this work to go be the black person who can tame other black people for you. None of us are. It was clear that you weren’t getting the answers or feedback that you wanted. I’m sure you were aware of the people expressing their dismay in the background as you charged on to talk at length about how what we REALLY need to just focus on less race stuff and more political stuff. According to you, the solution lies in pressuring elected officials and voting the bad eggs out of office. You asked question after question, made statement after statement, and barely paused for Deon or anyone else to answer. When she was able to sneak a word in edgewise, you cut her off again! This went round and around. You interrupted most of the people who spoke last night, including me. I explained that I rejected the Pro Choice vs. Pro Life framework because it leaves behind many of the communities represented in that room. I stated that while I was glad you came, I didn’t want this entire conversation to become us simply focused on and responding to you. I also said that when you ask questions of people like Deon, like Paris, like the many activists and organizers in that room who have exactly the kind of analysis that your organization sorely lacks, you need to shut up and listen. You didn’t. In fact, you cut me off before I could finish talking. Here’s more of what I want to say:

How dare you, Melissa? How dare you show up to an event by and for women of color, then go ahead to tell us that we’re not focusing on YOUR organization enough? That we aren’t showing up for YOU enough? We afforded you every opportunity last night to get a feel for where women of color are coming from on this issue. The answers to why we aren’t as common as we could be among the Planned Parenthood ranks was staring you in the face, and you turned away every time. You heard it from black women, you heard it from black men, you heard it from faith leaders and scholars and activists and average folks walking down the street. You even heard it from Laura McTighe, a white ally who was so upset by your behavior that she stepped forward to name that you had effectively derailed the entire conversation and wrapped it around yourself, and that it was inappropriate of you to ask women of color why they weren’t doing more for YOU. Did you listen to her? Did you listen when she said that she felt the more appropriate question to ask was how you, your organization, and white people in general could show up and be better allies for US?

I don’t think you did. What you did was talk over people, take up too much space emotionally and physically in the room. I knew you weren’t really engaged with us because people were standing uncomfortably in the back of the room while you sprawled across two chairs of your own…

If the Louisiana State director of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast can listen to the lived experiences of women of color and then try to mock us and disrupt our meetings, then what hope is there for Planned Parenthood to work in an anti-racist framework? Why should I bother with trusting or investing in any of your political ventures if you can’t see the merit in my community based activism?

Black women’s bodies are the scapegoat here. No matter how you turn it, when we view ourselves on your terms, the jokes fly about how we should go fight people for you. We are damned for having children, damned for having abortions, damned for refusing to navigate our bodies within your framework, and then chastised for not showing up for you….

Rather than resist the urge to stack oppressions like a playground contest, you tossed out you’re a lesbian from Shreveport and that I shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. I think I judged you appropriately. I think I had you figured out when I reluctantly had to lump you in with the rest of the big money non-profits that just want to hijack our stories for convenient marketing. I think I had you right when I assumed that you wouldn’t be able to simply be a member of the community that night. I think I was correct in assuming that you and the organization that you represent have a long way to go. If you commonly behave this way professionally, expect to alienate more and more people.

Well, wow. I’ve certainly been impressed by the depth and insight of these open letters. I may disagree with the bottom line of these particular WOC, who believe they need abortion in their equation, but I certainly come away with a better understanding of where they are coming from. It is also clear there is unbridled animus against Planned Parenthood. added:Planned Parenthood women of color abortion

This is Deon Haywood… 

So naturally, telling a room full of people that you’d like to put Katrina Jackson in a ring with her so she could kick Jackson’s ass isn’t going to go over all that well.

By the next day the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast issued an open letter apologizing for Flournoy.

By August 15 Flourney had posted news of her resignation on Facebook (now private)…


While it relieves me to see WOC “wary” of Planned Parenthood for using them to further its political agenda, this is only the display of a deeper insidious agenda, which is to profit from their woes. WOC must know by now they have a disproportionate share of abortions. This is because Planned Parenthood and the abortion industry target them.

The roots of the abortion industry are in the eugenics movement, which became popular in America after blacks were freed from slavery and no longer needed or wanted.


Reprinted with permission from

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Jeannie Deangelis


Abandoned newborn found in New York church nativity scene

Jeannie Deangelis

November 27, 2015 (LiveActionNews) -- Rather than kill him in the womb, or toss him out a window into a courtyard after he was born, a Queens, New York, mother wrapped her newborn in towels purchased from a 99-cent store and laid him in a Christmas Nativity manger on the lawn of Holy Child Jesus Roman Catholic Church.

It was church custodian José Moran who first heard the whimpering coming from the manger where he found the child who now bears the nickname “Baby Jesus.” His umbilical cord was still attached.

Moran told the New York Daily News that an hour after the nativity scene was erected, right after he returned from lunch, he was cleaning the church when he heard the infant cry.

José told reporters:

I looked around and didn’t see anyone. I followed the cries. I walked to the little nativity home we had installed inside the church… I couldn’t believe my eyes. The baby was wrapped in towels. He still had his umbilical cord. He was next to the Virgin (Mary).

Since the infant was found, police surveillance video has uncovered footage of a woman entering the church with what appears to be a baby who walked out with nothing in her arms. Officers also found tape in a local dollar store showing a woman with an infant inside her jacket purchasing towels.

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While authorities attempt to locate the woman on the tape, the healthy baby boy is now in the care of Administration of Children’s Services.

In New York State, as long as the infant is handed over to an appropriate person, the law permits unwanted newborns to be anonymously abandoned at places called “safe havens.” Women can surrender babies up to 30 days old at local churches, police stations, firehouses and hospitals.

Unfortunately, this mother could face criminal charges for leaving her baby in a manger without notifying anyone that he was there.

Calling the baby in the manger a “Christmas miracle,” one of the priests at the church, Father Christopher Ryan Heanue, said that the baby’s mother “must have been in a difficult place in her life.”

Heanue added, “God works in mysterious ways. ”

He certainly does! Perhaps we can be thankful this Thanksgiving that a woman in New York City, where 40 percent of pregnancies end in abortion, loved and cared enough for “Baby Jesús” to swaddle him in towels and selflessly place him in a crèche at a Richmond Hill church.

Reprinted with permission from Live Action News

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Dave Andrusko

Naomi was so premature doctors said she had no chance. Last week, she went home!

Dave Andrusko
By Dave Andrusko

Dec. 26, 2015 (NRLN) - We carry some very tragic news today. Here’s some of the best kind of news to help balance it out.

When a child is born 15 weeks early; when she weighs less than 13 ounces; when she can fit in the palm of your hand; and when Naomi Joy Bakker’s hands were the size of her dad’s thumbs, it’s easy to understand why some doctors told her parents “ Naomi’s chances of survival without health complications were less than one percent.” Or at all!

But in the less than five months she spent in the Renown Regional Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Naomi has met so many milestones. “Naomi is healthy and ready to graduate from the NICU with few complications,” according to Fox 28 reporter Elizabeth Faugl.

That’s a long way from the moment they learned of Naomi’s situation before she was born. “We got on our knees, and we begged,” Mrs. Bakker told Faugl. “And we said we would take her however he gave it. If she was blind, or whatever, we just wanted our baby.”

On July 1 Joy and Michael Bakker’s little one was born at only 25 weeks gestation. “Her eyes were still sealed and her organs underdeveloped,” Faugl explained. “Doctors across the country said she had no chance, but she’s proven them wrong.”

“She’s one of the littlest babies around. They told us there was no hope for her,” said Angela Bakker. “The first time I held her was so scary. So frightening. She was so tiny.”

But her nurses told Faugl:

her parents always came in to hold her. Even though Naomi was fragile, the skin-to-skin contact was important. And most of all, Naomi always had a feisty spirit.

“Strong, from day one, you could tell she was a fighter and she had it in her,” says Carrie Archie, one of Naomi’s primary nurses.

“We just gave her what she needed, she did all the hard work,” adds Nichol Alvaraez, another one of Naomi’s primary nurses.

It’s made all the difference. Naomi will go home to meet her big brother, who has only been able to Facetime with her. He’s only two-years-old and cannot go to the NICU.

Last Thursday, the “baton” was handed off. Naomi is now home from the Reno, Nevada, hospital.

Here’s what Michael and Angela wrote today:

At the hand off, a local channel did a story on Naomi and the NICU. Something happened we never planned on happened. This little blog to update friends and family went a little extra crazy and more people are following Naomi’s story. To all you who have just started on this journey with us, we have this to say – Thanks for all the encouraging posts and messages. It’s hard to find the time to respond to each and every one – but we have read them. This journey is a work in progress and we never know from one day to the next where it will lead. We hope you find encouragement through this story as we update family and friends on what is going on – with a moment of reflection here and there.

Enjoy the ride. I hope it’s not nearly as “dramatic” as the first leg.

Michael & Angela

You can share the Bakkers’ story on Facebook all the way back to July.

Reprinted with permission from National Right to Life News

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Abortionist Willie Parker
Katie Yoder

Abortionist reveals what convinced him to start doing abortions…and it’s bizarre

Katie Yoder
By Katie Yoder

November 23, 2015 (NewsBusters) -- Love can be about giving up one’s own life, but it is never about making someone else die.

On Wednesday, abortionist Willie J. Parker penned “Why I Provide Abortions” for the Opinion Pages of the New York Times. While he at first morally opposed abortions, Parker later decided that performing abortions fulfilled his call to be the “good” Samaritan. Today, he insists, abortion “respond[s] to our patients’ needs” and therefore expresses “the deepest level of love that you can have for another person.”

Before becoming an abortionist, Parker worked as an obstetrician and gynecologist for 12 years. He believed abortion was “morally wrong” – until, that is, he had a “change of heart.” That change came when he read a sermon by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Parker began performing abortions because that was where the need was greatest, he stated.

“In public health, you go where the crisis is,” he wrote. “If there is an outbreak and you have the ability to relieve suffering, you rush to the site of the need.”

And, well, Parker decided this “outbreak” – unwanted pregnancies – was a crisis that only abortion could answer.

“This is why, a year and a half ago,” he said, “I returned to my hometown, Birmingham, Ala., to provide abortions.”

In the past, Parker has attracted attention for also practicing at the sole abortion clinic in Mississippi.

While abortion is legal in the United States, he bemoaned how “women face harsh life circumstances and incessant hostility, merely for wanting to exercise their rights.”

Before becoming an abortionist, Parker worked as an obstetrician and gynecologist for 12 years. He believed abortion was “morally wrong” – until, that is, he had a “change of heart.”

That change came when he read a sermon by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that “challenged” him to a “deeper spiritual understanding.”

“I was moved by his discussion of the quality of the good Samaritan and of what made the Samaritan ‘good,’” he wrote. “I realized that if I were to show compassion, I would have to act on behalf of those women.”

(Parker seemed not to have read statements by Dr. Alveda King, the niece of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., where she declared her uncle was pro-life.)

In the end, what really worried Parker was providing “access to abortion” for women, not his reputation.

“My concern about women who lacked access to abortion became more important to me than worrying about what might happen to me for providing the services,” he continued.

Today, when people ask him why he aborts babies, he responds: “The short answer is: Because I can. And: Because if I don’t, who will?”

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He deemed the South, where he works, as “one of the centers of the abortion crisis” and worried that, with the upcoming Supreme Court abortion regulation case, “Mississippi could become the first state with no abortion clinic.”

In his piece, Parker also sounded like he didn’t approve of any pregnancies.

“A majority of pregnancies in the South are unintended,” he lamented. “More than a quarter end in abortion. The rest are more likely than pregnancies that are chosen to lead to low birth weights and other poor outcomes.”

Regardless of statistics, Parker believed “every patient is unique” and recalled a mother of five who couldn’t care for another baby “financially or emotionally,” but had to wait for her “procedure” because of a state law.

“I want for women what I want for myself: a life of dignity, health, self-determination and the opportunity to excel and contribute,” he wrote. “We know that when women have access to abortion, contraception and medically accurate sex education, they thrive.”

But babies don’t. And women don’t either, according to women who regret their abortions.

Instead of acknowledging counterarguments, Parker insisted that abortion is an expression of love:

“We who provide abortions do so because our patients need us, and that’s what we are supposed to do: respond to our patients’ needs,” he concluded. “It is the deepest level of love that you can have for another personthat you can have compassion for their suffering and you can act to relieve it.”

That, simply put,” he added, “is why I provide abortion care."

Reprinted with permission from News Busters

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